Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Tue, 17 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Robert Cormier Born: January 17, 1925 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=21 On this day in 1925, author Robert Cormier was born into Leominster's tight-knit French-Canadian neighborhood, and he remained there for the rest of his life. After graduating from Fitchburg State College, he began a 30-year career as a newspaperman. But it was the novels he wrote for young adults that earned him a national reputation. A cheerful, mild-mannered man himself, he created characters caught in the grip of self-doubt, peer pressure, and adult expectation. When Fitchburg State established a Cormier Archive in 1981, the author expressed surprise that anyone would want his old papers. "It's nice, though, to have all those boxes out of the house," he said. "The closets were getting pretty full, and my wife was starting to complain." Tue, 17 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=21 On this day in 1925, author Robert Cormier was born into Leominster's tight-knit French-Canadian neighborhood, and he remained there for the rest of his life. After graduating from Fitchburg State College, he began a 30-year career as a newspaperman. But it was the novels he wrote for young adults that earned him a national reputation. A cheerful, mild-mannered man himself, he created characters caught in the grip of self-doubt, peer pressure, and adult expectation. When Fitchburg State established a Cormier Archive in 1981, the author expressed surprise that anyone would want his old papers. "It's nice, though, to have all those boxes out of the house," he said. "The closets were getting pretty full, and my wife was starting to complain." no 0:01:00 Robert Cormier Born: January 17, 1925 First Legal Sea Foods Lost to Fire: January 16, 1980 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=20 On this day in 1980, fire destroyed the original Legal Sea Foods fish market and restaurant in Cambridge. The restaurant re-opened, but the business soon outgrew the neighborhood. Today there are 30 family-owned Legal Sea Foods restaurants. All bear the same incongruous name, which goes back to the company's roots. In 1904, Harry Berkowitz called his Inman Square store Legal Cash Market because his customers could redeem legal, government-issued cash stamps there. When his son branched out into fish, he kept the "legal" name. Now his grandson runs the company out of a 75,000-square-foot headquarters overlooking Boston Harbor. On the roof sits a 45-foot-long stainless steel sculpture of a New England cod. Mon, 16 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=20 On this day in 1980, fire destroyed the original Legal Sea Foods fish market and restaurant in Cambridge. The restaurant re-opened, but the business soon outgrew the neighborhood. Today there are 30 family-owned Legal Sea Foods restaurants. All bear the same incongruous name, which goes back to the company's roots. In 1904, Harry Berkowitz called his Inman Square store Legal Cash Market because his customers could redeem legal, government-issued cash stamps there. When his son branched out into fish, he kept the "legal" name. Now his grandson runs the company out of a 75,000-square-foot headquarters overlooking Boston Harbor. On the roof sits a 45-foot-long stainless steel sculpture of a New England cod. no 0:01:00 First Legal Sea Foods Lost to Fire: January 16, 1980 Great Molasses Flood : January 15, 1919 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=19 On this day in 1919, people in Boston's North End were startled by a loud rumbling noise. They watched in horror as a five-story tank broke apart, unleashing a wave of molasses 15 feet high and 160 feet wide. Moving at 35 miles per hour, it traveled over two blocks and engulfed everything in its path. The disaster killed 21 people, injured 150, and caused property damage of more than $100,000,000 in today's dollars. The tank's owners claimed that anarchists had dynamited it as a protest against the American government. In fact, the tank had been hastily constructed and overloaded. Years later, the tank's owner was found liable and ordered to pay compensation to the victims. Sun, 15 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=19 On this day in 1919, people in Boston's North End were startled by a loud rumbling noise. They watched in horror as a five-story tank broke apart, unleashing a wave of molasses 15 feet high and 160 feet wide. Moving at 35 miles per hour, it traveled over two blocks and engulfed everything in its path. The disaster killed 21 people, injured 150, and caused property damage of more than $100,000,000 in today's dollars. The tank's owners claimed that anarchists had dynamited it as a protest against the American government. In fact, the tank had been hastily constructed and overloaded. Years later, the tank's owner was found liable and ordered to pay compensation to the victims. no 0:01:00 Great Molasses Flood : January 15, 1919 Nation's First Country Club Established: January 14, 1882 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=18 On this day in 1882, a group of men from the social elite of Boston formally established The Country Club of Brookline, the first such club in the United States. Only four miles from the center of Boston, Brookline attracted well-to-do families who could afford to get away from the city for the summer. After the Civil War, many of these families turned their summer retreats into year-round suburban residences. Country clubs offered horseback riding, shooting, tennis, and the newest sport, golf, in a pastoral setting not far from home. Unlike downtown city clubs, which were restricted to men, country clubs also allowed wives and children to participate in their activities. But not all families were welcome. Membership was by invitation only. Sat, 14 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=18 On this day in 1882, a group of men from the social elite of Boston formally established The Country Club of Brookline, the first such club in the United States. Only four miles from the center of Boston, Brookline attracted well-to-do families who could afford to get away from the city for the summer. After the Civil War, many of these families turned their summer retreats into year-round suburban residences. Country clubs offered horseback riding, shooting, tennis, and the newest sport, golf, in a pastoral setting not far from home. Unlike downtown city clubs, which were restricted to men, country clubs also allowed wives and children to participate in their activities. But not all families were welcome. Membership was by invitation only. no 0:01:00 Nation's First Country Club Established: January 14, 1882 Horatio Alger Born: January 13, 1832 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=17 On this day in 1834*, Horatio Alger was born in Revere. The author of the rags-to-riches stories that captured the imagination of generations of American boys, Alger was always more interested in literature than in the ministry, the profession his father had chosen for him. He attended college and divinity school, but left the ministry after only a few years to pursue a writing career. At age 30, he moved to New York and began writing stories about boys living by their wits on the city streets. In Alger's tales, the impoverished but virtuous hero is befriended by a wealthy gentleman who helps establish him in business. Over the next 35 years, Horatio Alger wrote more than 70 stories, all with this same basic plot. Fri, 13 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=17 On this day in 1834*, Horatio Alger was born in Revere. The author of the rags-to-riches stories that captured the imagination of generations of American boys, Alger was always more interested in literature than in the ministry, the profession his father had chosen for him. He attended college and divinity school, but left the ministry after only a few years to pursue a writing career. At age 30, he moved to New York and began writing stories about boys living by their wits on the city streets. In Alger's tales, the impoverished but virtuous hero is befriended by a wealthy gentleman who helps establish him in business. Over the next 35 years, Horatio Alger wrote more than 70 stories, all with this same basic plot. no 0:01:00 Horatio Alger Born: January 13, 1832 Bread and Roses Strike Begins: January 12, 1912 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=16 On this day in 1912, the labor protest later known as the "Bread and Roses" strike began in Lawrence. A new state law had reduced the maximum workweek from 56 to 54 hours. Factory owners responded by speeding up production and cutting workers' pay. Polish women were the first to shut down their looms and leave the mill. As they marched through the streets, workers from all the city's ethnic groups joined them. Over the next months, increasingly violent methods were used to suppress the protest, but the strikers maintained their solidarity. After Congress held hearings on the situation, the mill owners were anxious to avoid bad publicity. They settled with the strikers, bringing to an end a watershed event in American labor history. Thu, 12 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=16 On this day in 1912, the labor protest later known as the "Bread and Roses" strike began in Lawrence. A new state law had reduced the maximum workweek from 56 to 54 hours. Factory owners responded by speeding up production and cutting workers' pay. Polish women were the first to shut down their looms and leave the mill. As they marched through the streets, workers from all the city's ethnic groups joined them. Over the next months, increasingly violent methods were used to suppress the protest, but the strikers maintained their solidarity. After Congress held hearings on the situation, the mill owners were anxious to avoid bad publicity. They settled with the strikers, bringing to an end a watershed event in American labor history. no 0:01:00 Bread and Roses Strike Begins: January 12, 1912 The 'Sacred' Cod Moves to the New State House: January 11, 1798 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=1 On this day in 1798, the Massachusetts legislature paraded solemnly from the Old State House to its quarters in a new building at the top of Beacon Hill. Designed by Boston-born architect Charles Bulfinch, the elegant new State House was tangible evidence of the Commonwealth's growing prosperity. The men who governed Massachusetts were thinking of the state's promising future, but they brought with them a symbol of the past. They carried a four-foot, eleven-inch wooden fish wrapped in an American flag. This "Sacred" Cod had hung in the Old State House, and it hangs in the new one to this very day. There is no better symbol of how much Massachusetts owes both its survival and its success to the humble cod fish. Wed, 11 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=1 On this day in 1798, the Massachusetts legislature paraded solemnly from the Old State House to its quarters in a new building at the top of Beacon Hill. Designed by Boston-born architect Charles Bulfinch, the elegant new State House was tangible evidence of the Commonwealth's growing prosperity. The men who governed Massachusetts were thinking of the state's promising future, but they brought with them a symbol of the past. They carried a four-foot, eleven-inch wooden fish wrapped in an American flag. This "Sacred" Cod had hung in the Old State House, and it hangs in the new one to this very day. There is no better symbol of how much Massachusetts owes both its survival and its success to the humble cod fish. no 0:01:00 The 'Sacred' Cod Moves to the New State House: January 11, 1798