Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Thu, 30 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Transcendentalists Publish The Dial: June 30, 1830 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=190 On this day in 1840 the first issue of the Transcendentalist magazine "The Dial" was published in Boston. The moving force behind this "journal in a new spirit" was Ralph Waldo Emerson, the man who stood at the center of Transcendentalism. The subject of the quarterly publication -- the first genuinely original journal published in the United States -- was, Emerson wrote, the "state of life and growth [that] is now . . . arriving." The men and women who contributed to "The Dial" were among the best minds of the nineteenth century. The magazine never made money or had more than a few hundred subscribers. It survived for less than four years, but Emerson and his fellow Transcendentalists had unprecedented influence on American culture. Thu, 30 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=190 On this day in 1840 the first issue of the Transcendentalist magazine "The Dial" was published in Boston. The moving force behind this "journal in a new spirit" was Ralph Waldo Emerson, the man who stood at the center of Transcendentalism. The subject of the quarterly publication -- the first genuinely original journal published in the United States -- was, Emerson wrote, the "state of life and growth [that] is now . . . arriving." The men and women who contributed to "The Dial" were among the best minds of the nineteenth century. The magazine never made money or had more than a few hundred subscribers. It survived for less than four years, but Emerson and his fellow Transcendentalists had unprecedented influence on American culture. no 0:01:00 Transcendentalists Publish The Dial: June 30, 1830 Trainer Discovers Seabiscuit at Suffolk Downs: June 29, 1936 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=189 On this day in 1936, Tom Smith, an experienced horse trainer, spied an unlikely looking three-year-old Thoroughbred on the track at East Boston's Suffolk Downs. The two exchanged knowing nods. One year later, Smith returned to Suffolk Downs as the horse's trainer; this time, the awkward looking Seabiscuit electrified the crowd and won the Massachusetts Handicap. At the time, Suffolk Downs was not even as old as Seabiscuit. Massachusetts had only legalized betting on horse races in 1935, as the state looked for ways to raise revenue in the midst of the Great Depression. The track opened a mere two months after the gambling law was passed. Seventy-five years later, Suffolk Downs remains the only major Thoroughbred racetrack in Massachusetts. Wed, 29 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=189 On this day in 1936, Tom Smith, an experienced horse trainer, spied an unlikely looking three-year-old Thoroughbred on the track at East Boston's Suffolk Downs. The two exchanged knowing nods. One year later, Smith returned to Suffolk Downs as the horse's trainer; this time, the awkward looking Seabiscuit electrified the crowd and won the Massachusetts Handicap. At the time, Suffolk Downs was not even as old as Seabiscuit. Massachusetts had only legalized betting on horse races in 1935, as the state looked for ways to raise revenue in the midst of the Great Depression. The track opened a mere two months after the gambling law was passed. Seventy-five years later, Suffolk Downs remains the only major Thoroughbred racetrack in Massachusetts. no 0:01:00 Trainer Discovers Seabiscuit at Suffolk Downs: June 29, 1936 David Walker Found Dead: June 28, 1830 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=188 On this day in 1830, David Walker, a prominent and outspoken black man, was found dead in his Boston home. The year before he had written David Walker's Appeal To the Coloured Citizens of the World, among the most powerful anti-slavery works ever written. Walker denounced the American institution of slavery as the most oppressive in world history and called on people of African descent to resist slavery and racism by any means. The book terrified southern slave owners, who immediately labeled it seditious. A price was placed on Walker's head: $10,000 if he were brought in alive, $1,000 if dead. Walker's writing would influence virtually every black leader who followed, including W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X. Tue, 28 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=188 On this day in 1830, David Walker, a prominent and outspoken black man, was found dead in his Boston home. The year before he had written David Walker's Appeal To the Coloured Citizens of the World, among the most powerful anti-slavery works ever written. Walker denounced the American institution of slavery as the most oppressive in world history and called on people of African descent to resist slavery and racism by any means. The book terrified southern slave owners, who immediately labeled it seditious. A price was placed on Walker's head: $10,000 if he were brought in alive, $1,000 if dead. Walker's writing would influence virtually every black leader who followed, including W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X. no 0:01:00 David Walker Found Dead: June 28, 1830 Otis House Moved: June 27, 1925 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=187 On this day in 1925, workmen finished moving an historic Beacon Hill residence back from the brink of destruction. Cambridge Street was slated to be turned from a crooked cobblestone street into a wide thoroughfare, and the Harrison Gray Otis House was in the way. Fortunately, it belonged to the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. Founded 15 years earlier, the Society had already saved five historic properties from the wrecking ball. Now its own home was threatened. In an old New England tradition, the house was jacked up and moved. It has continued ever since to serve as the headquarters of what is now called Historic New England, the oldest and largest regional historic preservation organization in the nation. Mon, 27 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=187 On this day in 1925, workmen finished moving an historic Beacon Hill residence back from the brink of destruction. Cambridge Street was slated to be turned from a crooked cobblestone street into a wide thoroughfare, and the Harrison Gray Otis House was in the way. Fortunately, it belonged to the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. Founded 15 years earlier, the Society had already saved five historic properties from the wrecking ball. Now its own home was threatened. In an old New England tradition, the house was jacked up and moved. It has continued ever since to serve as the headquarters of what is now called Historic New England, the oldest and largest regional historic preservation organization in the nation. no 0:01:00 Otis House Moved: June 27, 1925 Dr. Boylston Experiments with Smallpox Inoculation: June 26, 1721 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=186 On this day in 1721, Boston doctor Zabdiel Boylston took a gamble with his young son's life and inoculated him against smallpox. Puritan minister Cotton Mather had learned from one of his slaves that in Africa people did not fear the disease that so terrified Europeans. The Africans placed a small amount of smallpox pus into a scratch on children's arms, thus making them immune to the disease. When an epidemic broke out in Boston in 1721, Mather wanted to try this method. He convinced Dr. Boylston, but other physicians and the public thought the idea barbaric, even sinful. However, when those Boylston inoculated survived, the tide of public opinion began to turn. Within a few years, the once-controversial practice would be routine. Sun, 26 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=186 On this day in 1721, Boston doctor Zabdiel Boylston took a gamble with his young son's life and inoculated him against smallpox. Puritan minister Cotton Mather had learned from one of his slaves that in Africa people did not fear the disease that so terrified Europeans. The Africans placed a small amount of smallpox pus into a scratch on children's arms, thus making them immune to the disease. When an epidemic broke out in Boston in 1721, Mather wanted to try this method. He convinced Dr. Boylston, but other physicians and the public thought the idea barbaric, even sinful. However, when those Boylston inoculated survived, the tide of public opinion began to turn. Within a few years, the once-controversial practice would be routine. no 0:01:00 Dr. Boylston Experiments with Smallpox Inoculation: June 26, 1721 Last Elevated Train Runs in Boston: June 25, 2004 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=185 On this day in 2004, Boston's last elevated train pulled into North Station. For over a century, Bostonians had avoided the congested streets below by riding trains carried on huge steel tracks overhead. When the El was built in 1901, people were thrilled to pay the five-cent fare to travel in mahogany-paneled cars from one shiny station to another. But over time city officials and most residents came to see the once-elegant El as a noisy eyesore. Gradually elevated lines were replaced with subways, and the tracks were demolished. The final run of the Green Line trolley on the last half-mile of elevated track marked a milestone in the modernization of the nation's oldest subway system, and, at the same time, the end of an era. Sat, 25 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=185 On this day in 2004, Boston's last elevated train pulled into North Station. For over a century, Bostonians had avoided the congested streets below by riding trains carried on huge steel tracks overhead. When the El was built in 1901, people were thrilled to pay the five-cent fare to travel in mahogany-paneled cars from one shiny station to another. But over time city officials and most residents came to see the once-elegant El as a noisy eyesore. Gradually elevated lines were replaced with subways, and the tracks were demolished. The final run of the Green Line trolley on the last half-mile of elevated track marked a milestone in the modernization of the nation's oldest subway system, and, at the same time, the end of an era. no 0:01:00 Last Elevated Train Runs in Boston: June 25, 2004 King Philip's War Breaks Out: June 24, 1675 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=184 On this day in 1675, Wampanoag warriors killed seven colonists in Swansea in retaliation for a series of injustices suffered at the hands of the English. This raid is generally considered the beginning of King Philip's War, a bloody conflict that would involve every New England colony and all the peoples of the Algonquian nation. Over the next year, members of the Abenaki, Narragansett, Nipmuc, and Wampanoag tribes attacked more than half of all the settlements in New England and reduced about a dozen towns in Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies to ashes. By August of 1676, more than 600 settlers had died and 1,200 homes had been burned. An estimated 3,000 Native Americans died at the hands of the English. Fri, 24 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=184 On this day in 1675, Wampanoag warriors killed seven colonists in Swansea in retaliation for a series of injustices suffered at the hands of the English. This raid is generally considered the beginning of King Philip's War, a bloody conflict that would involve every New England colony and all the peoples of the Algonquian nation. Over the next year, members of the Abenaki, Narragansett, Nipmuc, and Wampanoag tribes attacked more than half of all the settlements in New England and reduced about a dozen towns in Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies to ashes. By August of 1676, more than 600 settlers had died and 1,200 homes had been burned. An estimated 3,000 Native Americans died at the hands of the English. no 0:01:00 King Philip's War Breaks Out: June 24, 1675