Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Thu, 11 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities News of Peace Treaty Reaches Boston: February 12, 1815 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=50 On this day in 1815, news reached Boston that the War of 1812 was over. The U.S. had at first been a neutral party in a conflict between Britain and France. But when the British Navy began seizing American sailors, the U.S. imposed an embargo and then declared war. Both actions had severe consequences for Massachusetts, which was so dependent on maritime trade. Once the war began, the state's coastal towns -- especially those on Cape Cod -- came under attack from the Royal Navy. For two years, bombardment, invasion, looting, extortion, and hostage-taking were almost routine. Even today there are buildings in Falmouth that wear battle scars in the form of cannonball-sized holes. Fri, 12 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=50 On this day in 1815, news reached Boston that the War of 1812 was over. The U.S. had at first been a neutral party in a conflict between Britain and France. But when the British Navy began seizing American sailors, the U.S. imposed an embargo and then declared war. Both actions had severe consequences for Massachusetts, which was so dependent on maritime trade. Once the war began, the state's coastal towns -- especially those on Cape Cod -- came under attack from the Royal Navy. For two years, bombardment, invasion, looting, extortion, and hostage-taking were almost routine. Even today there are buildings in Falmouth that wear battle scars in the form of cannonball-sized holes. no 0:01:00 News of Peace Treaty Reaches Boston: February 12, 1815 "Gerrymander" Born in Massachusetts: February 11, 1812 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=49 On this day in 1812, a political monster -- the "Gerrymander" -- was born in the Massachusetts State House. Governor Elbridge Gerry signed a bill that created oddly-shaped voting districts in several parts of the state. The lines of these districts gave Gerry's party an advantage in the upcoming election. An artist added a head, wings, and claws to the strange shape that was the governor's new home district and declared it looked like a salamander. A quick-witted friend decided a better name was "Gerry-mander." Within a month, the image appeared as a cartoon in the local papers and gerrymander, later gerrymander [with a soft "g"], entered the language. The term has referred ever since to any deliberate redrawing of voting districts to influence the outcome of an election. Thu, 11 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=49 On this day in 1812, a political monster -- the "Gerrymander" -- was born in the Massachusetts State House. Governor Elbridge Gerry signed a bill that created oddly-shaped voting districts in several parts of the state. The lines of these districts gave Gerry's party an advantage in the upcoming election. An artist added a head, wings, and claws to the strange shape that was the governor's new home district and declared it looked like a salamander. A quick-witted friend decided a better name was "Gerry-mander." Within a month, the image appeared as a cartoon in the local papers and gerrymander, later gerrymander [with a soft "g"], entered the language. The term has referred ever since to any deliberate redrawing of voting districts to influence the outcome of an election. no 0:01:00 "Gerrymander" Born in Massachusetts: February 11, 1812 Lewis Latimer Awarded First Patent: February 10, 1874 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=48 On this day in 1874, inventor Lewis Latimer received his first patent. The son of a Virginia couple who had escaped from slavery, he was born and raised in Chelsea. After a stint in the Union Army, Latimer began his career as an office boy in a Boston patent firm. Over 50 years later, he ended it as one of the "Edison Pioneers," a group of distinguished men who had helped establish the electric light industry. In between, Lewis Latimer was instrumental in helping Thomas Alva Edison develop the incandescent light bulb. He was awarded patents for ten of his own inventions and published a layman's guide to the once mysterious, now ubiquitous, electric light bulb. Wed, 10 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=48 On this day in 1874, inventor Lewis Latimer received his first patent. The son of a Virginia couple who had escaped from slavery, he was born and raised in Chelsea. After a stint in the Union Army, Latimer began his career as an office boy in a Boston patent firm. Over 50 years later, he ended it as one of the "Edison Pioneers," a group of distinguished men who had helped establish the electric light industry. In between, Lewis Latimer was instrumental in helping Thomas Alva Edison develop the incandescent light bulb. He was awarded patents for ten of his own inventions and published a layman's guide to the once mysterious, now ubiquitous, electric light bulb. no 0:01:00 Lewis Latimer Awarded First Patent: February 10, 1874 Holyoke Man Invents Volleyball : February 9, 1895 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=47 On this day in 1895, a new game was first played at the YMCA in Holyoke. Many of the men who came to the Y were excited about another new game, basketball, but the Holyoke sports director was looking for a less strenuous indoor sport. Borrowing from basketball, tennis, and handball, William Morgan came up with "Mintonette," soon re-named volleyball. Over the next half-century, the game spread around the world. At the first Olympic competition in the 1964 games in Tokyo, the Soviet men and Japanese women took the gold medal. However, when the Volleyball Hall of Fame opened in 1987, it was in Holyoke, the Massachusetts mill town where the game was born. Tue, 09 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=47 On this day in 1895, a new game was first played at the YMCA in Holyoke. Many of the men who came to the Y were excited about another new game, basketball, but the Holyoke sports director was looking for a less strenuous indoor sport. Borrowing from basketball, tennis, and handball, William Morgan came up with "Mintonette," soon re-named volleyball. Over the next half-century, the game spread around the world. At the first Olympic competition in the 1964 games in Tokyo, the Soviet men and Japanese women took the gold medal. However, when the Volleyball Hall of Fame opened in 1987, it was in Holyoke, the Massachusetts mill town where the game was born. no 0:01:00 Holyoke Man Invents Volleyball : February 9, 1895 Silvio Conte Dies: February 8, 1991 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=46 On this day in 1991, Representative Silvio Conte died at age 70. A Republican in a largely Democratic state, more liberal than most members of his party, the Pittsfield native never lost an election in his 32-year career. A powerful figure in Congress for over 30 years, he was a fun-loving and down-to-earth man who maintained a strong bond with his constituents. He was an advocate for public education, medical research, and the preservation of natural resources. One of his last accomplishments was to shepherd legislation through Congress to clean up the Connecticut River and restore Atlantic Salmon to it. The Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, headquartered in Turners Falls, is named in his honor. Mon, 08 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=46 On this day in 1991, Representative Silvio Conte died at age 70. A Republican in a largely Democratic state, more liberal than most members of his party, the Pittsfield native never lost an election in his 32-year career. A powerful figure in Congress for over 30 years, he was a fun-loving and down-to-earth man who maintained a strong bond with his constituents. He was an advocate for public education, medical research, and the preservation of natural resources. One of his last accomplishments was to shepherd legislation through Congress to clean up the Connecticut River and restore Atlantic Salmon to it. The Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, headquartered in Turners Falls, is named in his honor. no 0:01:00 Silvio Conte Dies: February 8, 1991 Blizzard Paralyzes Massachusetts: February 7, 1978 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=45 On this day in 1978, the storm of the century paralyzed the entire state of Massachusetts. The Blizzard of '78 dropped between two and four feet of snow on the Bay State in the space of 32 hours. Ferocious winds created drifts as high as 15 feet. Along the coast, flood tides forced 10,000 people into emergency shelters. Inland, over 3,000 cars and 500 trucks were immobilized along an eight-mile stretch of Route 128. By the time it subsided, the storm had taken 29 Massachusetts lives, destroyed 11,000 homes, and caused more than one billion dollars in damage. The Blizzard of '78 is also remembered for many acts of kindness, cooperation, and courage. Sun, 07 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=45 On this day in 1978, the storm of the century paralyzed the entire state of Massachusetts. The Blizzard of '78 dropped between two and four feet of snow on the Bay State in the space of 32 hours. Ferocious winds created drifts as high as 15 feet. Along the coast, flood tides forced 10,000 people into emergency shelters. Inland, over 3,000 cars and 500 trucks were immobilized along an eight-mile stretch of Route 128. By the time it subsided, the storm had taken 29 Massachusetts lives, destroyed 11,000 homes, and caused more than one billion dollars in damage. The Blizzard of '78 is also remembered for many acts of kindness, cooperation, and courage. no 0:01:00 Blizzard Paralyzes Massachusetts: February 7, 1978 Activist Florence Luscomb Born: February 6, 1887 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=44 On this day in 1887, lifelong political activist Florence Luscomb was born in Lowell. As a child, she heard the legendary Susan B. Anthony speak. In her 20s, she traveled the state campaigning for woman suffrage. In her 30s, she ran for public office, coming within 1% point of winning a seat on the Boston City Council. In her 60s, she was the Progressive Party's nominee for Governor. She remained an activist well into her 80s. In the last decades of her long life, she was a living bridge between the first and second waves of American feminism. A bust of Luscomb is included in a work of art installed in the State House to honor the contributions of women to public life in Massachusetts. Sat, 06 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=44 On this day in 1887, lifelong political activist Florence Luscomb was born in Lowell. As a child, she heard the legendary Susan B. Anthony speak. In her 20s, she traveled the state campaigning for woman suffrage. In her 30s, she ran for public office, coming within 1% point of winning a seat on the Boston City Council. In her 60s, she was the Progressive Party's nominee for Governor. She remained an activist well into her 80s. In the last decades of her long life, she was a living bridge between the first and second waves of American feminism. A bust of Luscomb is included in a work of art installed in the State House to honor the contributions of women to public life in Massachusetts. no 0:01:00 Activist Florence Luscomb Born: February 6, 1887