Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Wed, 06 May 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Marblehead Carved Out of Salem: May 6, 1635 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=135 On this day in 1635, the General Court of Massachusetts Bay established the town of Marblehead on land that belonged to Salem. The move was meant to punish Salem for allowing Roger Williams to express his "dangerous opinions." Marblehead residents, who never saw eye-to-eye with their more devout neighbors, were delighted, but less than a year later, the lawmakers reversed themselves. Marblehead finally became independent of Salem in 1649. The feisty fishermen of Marblehead were not the last to go their own way. Danvers, Peabody, Beverly, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Wenham, and a section of Topsfield were all once part of Salem. One by one, smaller new towns were formed out of one large old one. This pattern was repeated many times over the next 200 years. Wed, 06 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=135 On this day in 1635, the General Court of Massachusetts Bay established the town of Marblehead on land that belonged to Salem. The move was meant to punish Salem for allowing Roger Williams to express his "dangerous opinions." Marblehead residents, who never saw eye-to-eye with their more devout neighbors, were delighted, but less than a year later, the lawmakers reversed themselves. Marblehead finally became independent of Salem in 1649. The feisty fishermen of Marblehead were not the last to go their own way. Danvers, Peabody, Beverly, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Wenham, and a section of Topsfield were all once part of Salem. One by one, smaller new towns were formed out of one large old one. This pattern was repeated many times over the next 200 years. no 0:01:00 Marblehead Carved Out of Salem: May 6, 1635 Winthrop Buys Passage for Ironworkers: May 5, 1643 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=134 On this day in 1643, John Winthrop, Jr. paid 50 pounds for the passage of skilled ironworkers from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Initially, the men worked at the iron works that Winthrop and other investors established in Braintree, but that enterprise soon failed. The first successful iron works in the American colonies began operation in Saugus in 1646. There, under oppressively hot, noisy, and dangerous conditions, men turned ore into cast and wrought iron. Although the Saugus Iron Works lasted only 22 years, it laid the foundation for the iron and steel industry in the United States. Thanks to the efforts of Saugus residents in the 1940s, the abandoned iron works was restored. Today it is a National Historic Site. Tue, 05 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=134 On this day in 1643, John Winthrop, Jr. paid 50 pounds for the passage of skilled ironworkers from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Initially, the men worked at the iron works that Winthrop and other investors established in Braintree, but that enterprise soon failed. The first successful iron works in the American colonies began operation in Saugus in 1646. There, under oppressively hot, noisy, and dangerous conditions, men turned ore into cast and wrought iron. Although the Saugus Iron Works lasted only 22 years, it laid the foundation for the iron and steel industry in the United States. Thanks to the efforts of Saugus residents in the 1940s, the abandoned iron works was restored. Today it is a National Historic Site. no 0:01:00 Winthrop Buys Passage for Ironworkers: May 5, 1643 Sarah Remond Ejected from Boston Theater: May 4, 1853 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=133 On this day in 1853, Sarah Parker Remond and two other African Americans entered a Boston theater intending to enjoy a Mozart opera. When the manager discovered they were people of color, he directed them to the segregated balcony. Remond and her companions refused to sit there. When they were asked to leave, an argument ensued, and the police were summoned. One of the officers handled Sarah roughly. Refusing to be intimidated, she sued and won $500 in damages. The Remond family challenged discrimination on all fronts. Sarah's brother Charles was the first black man to testify before the Massachusetts House when he protested being forced to sit in segregated railway cars, another example of the racism Massachusetts blacks faced in their home state. Mon, 04 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=133 On this day in 1853, Sarah Parker Remond and two other African Americans entered a Boston theater intending to enjoy a Mozart opera. When the manager discovered they were people of color, he directed them to the segregated balcony. Remond and her companions refused to sit there. When they were asked to leave, an argument ensued, and the police were summoned. One of the officers handled Sarah roughly. Refusing to be intimidated, she sued and won $500 in damages. The Remond family challenged discrimination on all fronts. Sarah's brother Charles was the first black man to testify before the Massachusetts House when he protested being forced to sit in segregated railway cars, another example of the racism Massachusetts blacks faced in their home state. no 0:01:00 Sarah Remond Ejected from Boston Theater: May 4, 1853 Ceremony Honors Early Indian Students: May 3, 1997 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=132 On this day in 1997, over 300 people gathered in Harvard Yard to commemorate a long forgotten part of the college's history. A plaque was unveiled that read, "Near this spot, from 1655 to 1698, stood the Indian College. Here American Indian and English students lived and studied in accordance with the 1650 Charter of Harvard College calling for 'The Education of the English and Indian Youth of this Country.'" During the four decades of the Indian College's existence, the building housed one of the first printing presses in the colonies. The press issued 15 books in the Algonquin language and 85 in English. The Indian Bible printed there in 1663 was the first Bible in any language to be printed in British North America. Sun, 03 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=132 On this day in 1997, over 300 people gathered in Harvard Yard to commemorate a long forgotten part of the college's history. A plaque was unveiled that read, "Near this spot, from 1655 to 1698, stood the Indian College. Here American Indian and English students lived and studied in accordance with the 1650 Charter of Harvard College calling for 'The Education of the English and Indian Youth of this Country.'" During the four decades of the Indian College's existence, the building housed one of the first printing presses in the colonies. The press issued 15 books in the Algonquin language and 85 in English. The Indian Bible printed there in 1663 was the first Bible in any language to be printed in British North America. no 0:01:00 Ceremony Honors Early Indian Students: May 3, 1997 Composer Stravinsky Visits Gropius House in Lincoln: May 2, 1940 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=131 On this day in 1940, the German-born architect Walter Gropius and his wife Ise opened their new home in Lincoln to some old friends -- the great composer Igor Stravinsky and his wife Vera. Gropius had designed the house according to the principles of the Bauhaus, the European school of architecture that he founded in 1919. Modest but graceful, the house integrated modern industrial materials with elements of traditional New England buildings. But the house was more than an architectural attraction -- it was a warm home. In the words of daughter Ati Gropius, there was "a never-ending parade of visitors, far-away friends, strangers and students marching through the house at all hours of the day." Today it is a National Historic Landmark. Sat, 02 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=131 On this day in 1940, the German-born architect Walter Gropius and his wife Ise opened their new home in Lincoln to some old friends -- the great composer Igor Stravinsky and his wife Vera. Gropius had designed the house according to the principles of the Bauhaus, the European school of architecture that he founded in 1919. Modest but graceful, the house integrated modern industrial materials with elements of traditional New England buildings. But the house was more than an architectural attraction -- it was a warm home. In the words of daughter Ati Gropius, there was "a never-ending parade of visitors, far-away friends, strangers and students marching through the house at all hours of the day." Today it is a National Historic Landmark. no 0:01:00 Composer Stravinsky Visits Gropius House in Lincoln: May 2, 1940 Agrippa Hull Enlists: May 1, 1777 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=130 On this day in 1777, Agrippa Hull, a freeborn black man from the Berkshire County town of Stockbridge, signed on to serve in the Continental Army for the duration of the Revolutionary War. The 18-year-old was one of over 5,500 men of color -- free and slave -- to fight for American independence. Blacks were eager to serve, despite the fact that official policy discouraged their recruitment. Hull gave more than six years of his life to the cause, serving as an orderly to two distinguished generals. After the war ended, Hull returned to Stockbridge and raised a large family. He was respected in his hometown as something of a philosopher, a man of intelligence and wit, and, above all, as a devoted Patriot. Fri, 01 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=130 On this day in 1777, Agrippa Hull, a freeborn black man from the Berkshire County town of Stockbridge, signed on to serve in the Continental Army for the duration of the Revolutionary War. The 18-year-old was one of over 5,500 men of color -- free and slave -- to fight for American independence. Blacks were eager to serve, despite the fact that official policy discouraged their recruitment. Hull gave more than six years of his life to the cause, serving as an orderly to two distinguished generals. After the war ended, Hull returned to Stockbridge and raised a large family. He was respected in his hometown as something of a philosopher, a man of intelligence and wit, and, above all, as a devoted Patriot. no 0:01:00 Agrippa Hull Enlists: May 1, 1777 Springfield Armory Closes : April 30, 1968 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=129 On this day in 1968, there was great sadness in Springfield as the city's historic armory closed its doors after nearly two centuries as the leading producer of small arms for the American military. First established by George Washington early in the Revolutionary War, the armory became a pioneer in mass production, division of labor, and industrial management. Among the most innovative and important weapons it produced were the "Springfield '03" rifle that U.S. soldiers carried in World War I and the classic M1 semiautomatic rifle that played a critical role in World War II. Ten years after the armory was shut down, the National Park Service opened a museum on the site that traces the story of the development of arms and industry in Springfield. Thu, 30 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=129 On this day in 1968, there was great sadness in Springfield as the city's historic armory closed its doors after nearly two centuries as the leading producer of small arms for the American military. First established by George Washington early in the Revolutionary War, the armory became a pioneer in mass production, division of labor, and industrial management. Among the most innovative and important weapons it produced were the "Springfield '03" rifle that U.S. soldiers carried in World War I and the classic M1 semiautomatic rifle that played a critical role in World War II. Ten years after the armory was shut down, the National Park Service opened a museum on the site that traces the story of the development of arms and industry in Springfield. no 0:01:00 Springfield Armory Closes : April 30, 1968