Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sun, 19 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Lydia Maria Child Dies: October 20, 1880 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=303 On this day in 1880, Lydia Maria Child, whom abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison called "the first woman in the Republic," was buried in Wayland. A successful novelist and magazine editor and the author of a widely read guide to household economy, she sacrificed her career by taking a highly unpopular stand against slavery. Her anti-slavery work enraged most of the nation and cost Child dearly. She could no longer sell her books or publish her writings, and she lost her job at a children's magazine. But Child continued to argue eloquently and courageously against injustice of all kinds. The eulogist at her funeral declared that Lydia Maria Child was "ready to die for a principle and starve for an idea. . . ." Mon, 20 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=303 On this day in 1880, Lydia Maria Child, whom abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison called "the first woman in the Republic," was buried in Wayland. A successful novelist and magazine editor and the author of a widely read guide to household economy, she sacrificed her career by taking a highly unpopular stand against slavery. Her anti-slavery work enraged most of the nation and cost Child dearly. She could no longer sell her books or publish her writings, and she lost her job at a children's magazine. But Child continued to argue eloquently and courageously against injustice of all kinds. The eulogist at her funeral declared that Lydia Maria Child was "ready to die for a principle and starve for an idea. . . ." no 0:01:00 Lydia Maria Child Dies: October 20, 1880 Ku Klux Klan Rallies in Worcester: October 19, 1924 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=302 On this day in 1924, the largest gathering of the Ku Klux Klan ever held in New England took place at the Agricultural Fairgrounds in Worcester. Klansmen in sheets and hoods, new Knights awaiting a mass induction ceremony, and supporters swelled the crowd to 15,000. The KKK had hired more than 400 "husky guards," but when the rally ended around midnight, a riot broke out. Klansmen's cars were stoned, burned, and windows smashed. KKK members were pulled from their cars and beaten. Klansmen called for police protection, but the situation raged out of control for most of the night. The violence after the "Klanvocation" had the desired effect. Membership fell off, and no further public Klan meetings were held in Worcester. Sun, 19 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=302 On this day in 1924, the largest gathering of the Ku Klux Klan ever held in New England took place at the Agricultural Fairgrounds in Worcester. Klansmen in sheets and hoods, new Knights awaiting a mass induction ceremony, and supporters swelled the crowd to 15,000. The KKK had hired more than 400 "husky guards," but when the rally ended around midnight, a riot broke out. Klansmen's cars were stoned, burned, and windows smashed. KKK members were pulled from their cars and beaten. Klansmen called for police protection, but the situation raged out of control for most of the night. The violence after the "Klanvocation" had the desired effect. Membership fell off, and no further public Klan meetings were held in Worcester. no 0:01:00 Ku Klux Klan Rallies in Worcester: October 19, 1924 Town Meeting Auctions Poor Woman to Lowest Bidder: October 18, 1786 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=301 On this day in 1786, Malden's selectmen put up for "vendue" Mary Degresha, who was unable to support herself. They auctioned her off to the lowest bidder, who agreed to accept payment of six dollars a week for housing and "taking proper care" of her. For two centuries, Massachusetts towns were responsible for supporting those who could not support themselves. Sometimes this meant providing necessities, such as clothing, firewood, or food. Other times, a household was compensated for taking in an indigent man, woman, or child. In the 1820s, a gradual shift began toward institutionalizing the poor in almshouses or workhouses. Early in the twentieth century, the state took over responsibility for the Commonwealth's poorest citizens. Sat, 18 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=301 On this day in 1786, Malden's selectmen put up for "vendue" Mary Degresha, who was unable to support herself. They auctioned her off to the lowest bidder, who agreed to accept payment of six dollars a week for housing and "taking proper care" of her. For two centuries, Massachusetts towns were responsible for supporting those who could not support themselves. Sometimes this meant providing necessities, such as clothing, firewood, or food. Other times, a household was compensated for taking in an indigent man, woman, or child. In the 1820s, a gradual shift began toward institutionalizing the poor in almshouses or workhouses. Early in the twentieth century, the state took over responsibility for the Commonwealth's poorest citizens. no 0:01:00 Town Meeting Auctions Poor Woman to Lowest Bidder: October 18, 1786 Mashpee Indians Sue for Recognition: October 17, 1978 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=300 On this day in 1978, a trial began on Cape Cod to determine whether the Mashpee Indians met the legal definition of a tribe. If they did, they could sue for the return of land granted to them in 1685. With huge amounts of undeveloped land at stake, Mashpee's non-Indian residents hired lawyers. The defense argued that the Mashpee Wampanoag had intermarried with so many different groups over the years that they were no longer genetically the same people as the original Mashpee. The lawyers also claimed that the Mashpee had not maintained their traditions. After a 40-day trial, the judge declared that the Mashpee Wampanoag did not meet the legal definition of a tribe and therefore had no standing to sue. The case was dismissed. Fri, 17 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=300 On this day in 1978, a trial began on Cape Cod to determine whether the Mashpee Indians met the legal definition of a tribe. If they did, they could sue for the return of land granted to them in 1685. With huge amounts of undeveloped land at stake, Mashpee's non-Indian residents hired lawyers. The defense argued that the Mashpee Wampanoag had intermarried with so many different groups over the years that they were no longer genetically the same people as the original Mashpee. The lawyers also claimed that the Mashpee had not maintained their traditions. After a 40-day trial, the judge declared that the Mashpee Wampanoag did not meet the legal definition of a tribe and therefore had no standing to sue. The case was dismissed. no 0:01:00 Mashpee Indians Sue for Recognition: October 17, 1978 Boston Dentist Demonstrates Ether: October 16, 1846 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=299 On this day in 1846, a crowd gathered in the operating theater at Massachusetts General Hospital. A Boston printer with a tumor on his jaw lay on the table. Curious and skeptical physicians and medical students waited impatiently. Finally, Boston dentist William Morton entered the room carrying a glass inhaler with an ether-soaked sponge. He used this apparatus to render the patient unconscious. A surgeon then removed the tumor. After the patient recovered consciousness, he reported that he had experienced no pain but only a sensation like that of being scraped with a blunt instrument. The historic moment was proclaimed "Ether Day," and hailed around the world as "the greatest gift ever known to mankind." One London newspaper declared "WE HAVE CONQUERED PAIN." Thu, 16 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=299 On this day in 1846, a crowd gathered in the operating theater at Massachusetts General Hospital. A Boston printer with a tumor on his jaw lay on the table. Curious and skeptical physicians and medical students waited impatiently. Finally, Boston dentist William Morton entered the room carrying a glass inhaler with an ether-soaked sponge. He used this apparatus to render the patient unconscious. A surgeon then removed the tumor. After the patient recovered consciousness, he reported that he had experienced no pain but only a sensation like that of being scraped with a blunt instrument. The historic moment was proclaimed "Ether Day," and hailed around the world as "the greatest gift ever known to mankind." One London newspaper declared "WE HAVE CONQUERED PAIN." no 0:01:00 Boston Dentist Demonstrates Ether: October 16, 1846 Indian Rights Activist Born in Amherst: October 15, 1830 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=298 On this day in 1830, an Amherst College professor and his wife rejoiced at the safe delivery of their second child, Helen Maria Fiske. A lifelong friend of Emily Dickinson and a talented poet in her own right, Helen Fiske Hunt Jackson would become one of the most admired and prolific authors of her time. Her poems, essays, travel sketches, and children's stories were widely published in the 1860s. On a visit to Boston in 1879, she heard an Indian chief speak about the injustices his people had suffered at the hands of the U.S. government. Never before involved in reform, Jackson was moved to action. She became a crusader for Indian rights and devoted the rest of her life to the cause. Wed, 15 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=298 On this day in 1830, an Amherst College professor and his wife rejoiced at the safe delivery of their second child, Helen Maria Fiske. A lifelong friend of Emily Dickinson and a talented poet in her own right, Helen Fiske Hunt Jackson would become one of the most admired and prolific authors of her time. Her poems, essays, travel sketches, and children's stories were widely published in the 1860s. On a visit to Boston in 1879, she heard an Indian chief speak about the injustices his people had suffered at the hands of the U.S. government. Never before involved in reform, Jackson was moved to action. She became a crusader for Indian rights and devoted the rest of her life to the cause. no 0:01:00 Indian Rights Activist Born in Amherst: October 15, 1830 Margaret Marshall Appointed to Supreme Judicial Court: October 14, 1999 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=297 On this day in 1999, Margaret Marshall became the first woman appointed Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. The oldest court in the Western Hemisphere, the SJC was established in 1693 in the aftermath of the Salem witch trials. Over three centuries later, Governor Paul Cellucci made history when he named a South African-born woman to lead the court. When her involvement in the anti-apartheid movement put her life at risk, Margaret Marshall emigrated to the United States, earned a law degree, and settled in Massachusetts. Her nomination as Chief Justice was controversial, and some of her rulings have been even more so. Undoubtedly the most controversial is the 2003 Goodridge decision, which legalized gay marriage in Massachusetts. Tue, 14 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=297 On this day in 1999, Margaret Marshall became the first woman appointed Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. The oldest court in the Western Hemisphere, the SJC was established in 1693 in the aftermath of the Salem witch trials. Over three centuries later, Governor Paul Cellucci made history when he named a South African-born woman to lead the court. When her involvement in the anti-apartheid movement put her life at risk, Margaret Marshall emigrated to the United States, earned a law degree, and settled in Massachusetts. Her nomination as Chief Justice was controversial, and some of her rulings have been even more so. Undoubtedly the most controversial is the 2003 Goodridge decision, which legalized gay marriage in Massachusetts. no 0:01:00 Margaret Marshall Appointed to Supreme Judicial Court: October 14, 1999