Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sat, 25 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Boston Celebrates Opening of Aqueduct: October 25, 1848 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=308 On this day in 1848, 300,000 people from all over New England gathered on Boston Common. They came to celebrate the completion of the city's first municipal water system. With the construction of an aqueduct that brought fresh water 15 miles from Lake Cochituate in Natick to Boston, the city for the first time had a pure supply of water for drinking, bathing, cooking, and cleaning. As the sun set, the gates to the fountain in Frog Pond were opened and a stream of clean water shot 80 feet in the air. People cheered and wept with joy. The celebration continued the next day, when the mayor announced that schools would close so that the city's children could play in the Frog Pond fountain. Sat, 25 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=308 On this day in 1848, 300,000 people from all over New England gathered on Boston Common. They came to celebrate the completion of the city's first municipal water system. With the construction of an aqueduct that brought fresh water 15 miles from Lake Cochituate in Natick to Boston, the city for the first time had a pure supply of water for drinking, bathing, cooking, and cleaning. As the sun set, the gates to the fountain in Frog Pond were opened and a stream of clean water shot 80 feet in the air. People cheered and wept with joy. The celebration continued the next day, when the mayor announced that schools would close so that the city's children could play in the Frog Pond fountain. no 0:01:00 Boston Celebrates Opening of Aqueduct: October 25, 1848 First National Woman's Rights Convention Ends in Worcester: October 24, 1850 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=307 On this day in 1850, the first national convention for woman's rights concluded in Worcester. For two days, more than 1,000 delegates from 11 different states had filled Brinley Hall to overflowing. Speakers, most of them women, demanded the right to vote, to own property, to be admitted to higher education, medicine, the ministry, and other professions. Many newspaper reporters heaped scorn on the convention. Although derisive, the press coverage actually helped bring the convention to the attention of a broad national audience and build support for the movement. Other national conventions followed, but change was slow. It took another 70 years -- long after most of the delegates to the Worcester Convention had died -- before American women won the right to vote. Fri, 24 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=307 On this day in 1850, the first national convention for woman's rights concluded in Worcester. For two days, more than 1,000 delegates from 11 different states had filled Brinley Hall to overflowing. Speakers, most of them women, demanded the right to vote, to own property, to be admitted to higher education, medicine, the ministry, and other professions. Many newspaper reporters heaped scorn on the convention. Although derisive, the press coverage actually helped bring the convention to the attention of a broad national audience and build support for the movement. Other national conventions followed, but change was slow. It took another 70 years -- long after most of the delegates to the Worcester Convention had died -- before American women won the right to vote. no 0:01:00 First National Woman's Rights Convention Ends in Worcester: October 24, 1850 First Missionaries Leave for Hawaii: October 23, 1819 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=306 On this day in 1819, a crowd gathered on a Boston wharf to bid farewell to the first Protestant missionaries bound for Hawaii. Among them were seven Massachusetts couples, four of them recently married. After a difficult five-month voyage, they got their first glimpse of the Big Island and its people. The islanders were friendly, curious, and easy-going, but their near-nakedness, ignorance of "civilized" ways, and apparent laziness shocked the missionaries. Although frustrated by the natives' lack of interest in farming, sewing, cleaning, and cooking, most of the couples stayed for years, building New England-style churches and schools, translating the Bible and other Protestant works into Hawaiian, and providing medical care. Most never returned to New England. Thu, 23 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=306 On this day in 1819, a crowd gathered on a Boston wharf to bid farewell to the first Protestant missionaries bound for Hawaii. Among them were seven Massachusetts couples, four of them recently married. After a difficult five-month voyage, they got their first glimpse of the Big Island and its people. The islanders were friendly, curious, and easy-going, but their near-nakedness, ignorance of "civilized" ways, and apparent laziness shocked the missionaries. Although frustrated by the natives' lack of interest in farming, sewing, cleaning, and cooking, most of the couples stayed for years, building New England-style churches and schools, translating the Bible and other Protestant works into Hawaiian, and providing medical care. Most never returned to New England. no 0:01:00 First Missionaries Leave for Hawaii: October 23, 1819 Millerites Await End of the World: October 22, 1844 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=305 On this day in 1844, tens of thousands of people in Massachusetts expected the world to come to an end. They were followers of William Miller, a man who claimed to know the date of Jesus's second coming. Many "Millerites" sold all their possessions to prepare for the day when Christ would return to earth, gather them up to heaven, and purify the rest of the world in an all-consuming fire. As the date approached, a great comet blazed across the Massachusetts sky, and the number of believers grew. On October 22nd, the Millerites donned white robes and climbed mountains or trees to speed their ascension into heaven. When the prophecy failed, most abandoned Miller's apocalyptical teachings and returned to their original churches. Wed, 22 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=305 On this day in 1844, tens of thousands of people in Massachusetts expected the world to come to an end. They were followers of William Miller, a man who claimed to know the date of Jesus's second coming. Many "Millerites" sold all their possessions to prepare for the day when Christ would return to earth, gather them up to heaven, and purify the rest of the world in an all-consuming fire. As the date approached, a great comet blazed across the Massachusetts sky, and the number of believers grew. On October 22nd, the Millerites donned white robes and climbed mountains or trees to speed their ascension into heaven. When the prophecy failed, most abandoned Miller's apocalyptical teachings and returned to their original churches. no 0:01:00 Millerites Await End of the World: October 22, 1844 USS Constitution Launched in Boston: October 21, 1797 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=304 On this day in 1797, USS Constitution was launched in Boston. It took three attempts to set the immense ship, reinforced with heavy diagonal planking and copper sheathing, afloat. Shipyard officials warned townspeople to be prepared for a great wave when the boat was finally launched, but none appeared. Her greatest moment came during the War of 1812, when in less than 20 minutes her guns turned a British warship into a hulk, not worth towing to port. When British cannonballs appeared to bounce off her thick wooden hull, a sailor exclaimed, "Huzzah, her sides are made of iron!" Ever since, people have referred to the ship by her affectionate nickname "Old Ironsides." Berthed at the Boston Navy Yard, she is the oldest commissioned warship in the world. Tue, 21 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=304 On this day in 1797, USS Constitution was launched in Boston. It took three attempts to set the immense ship, reinforced with heavy diagonal planking and copper sheathing, afloat. Shipyard officials warned townspeople to be prepared for a great wave when the boat was finally launched, but none appeared. Her greatest moment came during the War of 1812, when in less than 20 minutes her guns turned a British warship into a hulk, not worth towing to port. When British cannonballs appeared to bounce off her thick wooden hull, a sailor exclaimed, "Huzzah, her sides are made of iron!" Ever since, people have referred to the ship by her affectionate nickname "Old Ironsides." Berthed at the Boston Navy Yard, she is the oldest commissioned warship in the world. no 0:01:00 USS Constitution Launched in Boston: October 21, 1797 Lydia Maria Child Dies: October 20, 1880 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=303 On this day in 1880, Lydia Maria Child, whom abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison called "the first woman in the Republic," was buried in Wayland. A successful novelist and magazine editor and the author of a widely read guide to household economy, she sacrificed her career by taking a highly unpopular stand against slavery. Her anti-slavery work enraged most of the nation and cost Child dearly. She could no longer sell her books or publish her writings, and she lost her job at a children's magazine. But Child continued to argue eloquently and courageously against injustice of all kinds. The eulogist at her funeral declared that Lydia Maria Child was "ready to die for a principle and starve for an idea. . . ." Mon, 20 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=303 On this day in 1880, Lydia Maria Child, whom abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison called "the first woman in the Republic," was buried in Wayland. A successful novelist and magazine editor and the author of a widely read guide to household economy, she sacrificed her career by taking a highly unpopular stand against slavery. Her anti-slavery work enraged most of the nation and cost Child dearly. She could no longer sell her books or publish her writings, and she lost her job at a children's magazine. But Child continued to argue eloquently and courageously against injustice of all kinds. The eulogist at her funeral declared that Lydia Maria Child was "ready to die for a principle and starve for an idea. . . ." no 0:01:00 Lydia Maria Child Dies: October 20, 1880 Ku Klux Klan Rallies in Worcester: October 19, 1924 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=302 On this day in 1924, the largest gathering of the Ku Klux Klan ever held in New England took place at the Agricultural Fairgrounds in Worcester. Klansmen in sheets and hoods, new Knights awaiting a mass induction ceremony, and supporters swelled the crowd to 15,000. The KKK had hired more than 400 "husky guards," but when the rally ended around midnight, a riot broke out. Klansmen's cars were stoned, burned, and windows smashed. KKK members were pulled from their cars and beaten. Klansmen called for police protection, but the situation raged out of control for most of the night. The violence after the "Klanvocation" had the desired effect. Membership fell off, and no further public Klan meetings were held in Worcester. Sun, 19 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=302 On this day in 1924, the largest gathering of the Ku Klux Klan ever held in New England took place at the Agricultural Fairgrounds in Worcester. Klansmen in sheets and hoods, new Knights awaiting a mass induction ceremony, and supporters swelled the crowd to 15,000. The KKK had hired more than 400 "husky guards," but when the rally ended around midnight, a riot broke out. Klansmen's cars were stoned, burned, and windows smashed. KKK members were pulled from their cars and beaten. Klansmen called for police protection, but the situation raged out of control for most of the night. The violence after the "Klanvocation" had the desired effect. Membership fell off, and no further public Klan meetings were held in Worcester. no 0:01:00 Ku Klux Klan Rallies in Worcester: October 19, 1924