Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sun, 25 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Rebels Attack Springfield Arsenal: January 25, 1787 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=30 On this day in 1787, 2,000 farmers from western Massachusetts attacked the new federal arsenal at Springfield. The government soldiers returned fire, killing three of the farmers. This was the beginning of the end of the uprising known as Shays' Rebellion, named for Daniel Shays, the man who led the insurgents. Western farmers had made economic sacrifices during the Revolution, and they were outraged when creditors demanded that they pay their debts immediately. They blamed the eastern merchants who controlled the legislature and the courts, and sought to assert their independence. The effort ended in defeat. 200 rebels were captured and tried for treason. Five were sentenced to death. John Hancock pardoned them all, within weeks of being elected governor. Sun, 25 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=30 On this day in 1787, 2,000 farmers from western Massachusetts attacked the new federal arsenal at Springfield. The government soldiers returned fire, killing three of the farmers. This was the beginning of the end of the uprising known as Shays' Rebellion, named for Daniel Shays, the man who led the insurgents. Western farmers had made economic sacrifices during the Revolution, and they were outraged when creditors demanded that they pay their debts immediately. They blamed the eastern merchants who controlled the legislature and the courts, and sought to assert their independence. The effort ended in defeat. 200 rebels were captured and tried for treason. Five were sentenced to death. John Hancock pardoned them all, within weeks of being elected governor. no 0:01:00 Rebels Attack Springfield Arsenal: January 25, 1787 Henry Knox Brings Cannon to Boston: January 24, 1776 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=29 On this day in 1776, Colonel Henry Knox reached the headquarters of the Continental Army in Cambridge. The young Boston bookseller had pulled off a daring plan. He had led a small group of men on a 300-mile journey from Boston to Fort Ticonderoga in New York State. Once there, the party disassembled cannon taken when the British surrendered the fort and retreated to Canada in May 1775. In less than two months time, Knox and his men moved 60 tons of artillery across lakes and rivers, through ice and snow to Boston. On March 7th, 2,000 Continental soldiers maneuvered the guns to a hill overlooking the city. The British had no choice but to evacuate Boston. Sat, 24 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=29 On this day in 1776, Colonel Henry Knox reached the headquarters of the Continental Army in Cambridge. The young Boston bookseller had pulled off a daring plan. He had led a small group of men on a 300-mile journey from Boston to Fort Ticonderoga in New York State. Once there, the party disassembled cannon taken when the British surrendered the fort and retreated to Canada in May 1775. In less than two months time, Knox and his men moved 60 tons of artillery across lakes and rivers, through ice and snow to Boston. On March 7th, 2,000 Continental soldiers maneuvered the guns to a hill overlooking the city. The British had no choice but to evacuate Boston. no 0:01:00 Henry Knox Brings Cannon to Boston: January 24, 1776 Indian Boys Arrive in Longmeadow: January 23, 1800 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=28 On this day in 1800, Thomas Thorakwaneken Williams arrived in Longmeadow with his two young sons, Eleazer and John. Thomas was the grandson of Eunice Williams, captured as a child during the 1704 Indian raid on Deerfield. Adopted into an Indian family, Eunice chose to remain with them despite vigorous attempts to "redeem" her. She married an Indian and lived as a Kahnawake Mohawk. When her great-grandsons were brought to Massachusetts to attend school, they wore blankets and moccasins and feathers in their hair and spoke no English. Gradually they shed their native dress and language. After five years, John returned to Canada but Eleazer spent the rest of his life moving back and forth between his Indian and white identities. Fri, 23 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=28 On this day in 1800, Thomas Thorakwaneken Williams arrived in Longmeadow with his two young sons, Eleazer and John. Thomas was the grandson of Eunice Williams, captured as a child during the 1704 Indian raid on Deerfield. Adopted into an Indian family, Eunice chose to remain with them despite vigorous attempts to "redeem" her. She married an Indian and lived as a Kahnawake Mohawk. When her great-grandsons were brought to Massachusetts to attend school, they wore blankets and moccasins and feathers in their hair and spoke no English. Gradually they shed their native dress and language. After five years, John returned to Canada but Eleazer spent the rest of his life moving back and forth between his Indian and white identities. no 0:01:00 Indian Boys Arrive in Longmeadow: January 23, 1800 The Crucible Opens on Broadway: January 22, 1953 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=27 On this day in 1953, Arthur Miller's play The Crucible opened on Broadway. Four years after winning the Pulitzer Prize for Death of a Salesman, Miller had written a far more controversial play. Set in Salem during the witchcraft trials of 1692, The Crucible is a masterful melding of fact and fiction. The play drew disturbing parallels between the events that ended with the hanging of 19 innocent men and women and the "witchhunt" being conducted by Senator Joseph McCarthy and the House Committee on Un-American Activities. While critics recognized Miller's courage in tackling such a provocative subject, they gave the play mixed reviews. Over time, it has become one of the classics of the American theatre. Thu, 22 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=27 On this day in 1953, Arthur Miller's play The Crucible opened on Broadway. Four years after winning the Pulitzer Prize for Death of a Salesman, Miller had written a far more controversial play. Set in Salem during the witchcraft trials of 1692, The Crucible is a masterful melding of fact and fiction. The play drew disturbing parallels between the events that ended with the hanging of 19 innocent men and women and the "witchhunt" being conducted by Senator Joseph McCarthy and the House Committee on Un-American Activities. While critics recognized Miller's courage in tackling such a provocative subject, they gave the play mixed reviews. Over time, it has become one of the classics of the American theatre. no 0:01:00 The Crucible Opens on Broadway: January 22, 1953 Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Organized : January 21, 1861 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=26 On this day in 1861, the Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia was formally organized. With war approaching, men who worked in the textile cities of Lowell and Lawrence joined this new infantry regiment. They were issued uniforms and rifles; they learned to drill. They waited for the call. It came on April 15th, three days after the attack on Fort Sumter. They were needed to defend Washington, D.C.. The mood when they left Boston was almost festive. When they arrived in the border state of Maryland three days later, everything changed. An angry mob awaited them. In the riot that followed, 16 people lost their lives. Four were soldiers from Massachusetts. These men were the first combat fatalities of the Civil War. Wed, 21 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=26 On this day in 1861, the Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia was formally organized. With war approaching, men who worked in the textile cities of Lowell and Lawrence joined this new infantry regiment. They were issued uniforms and rifles; they learned to drill. They waited for the call. It came on April 15th, three days after the attack on Fort Sumter. They were needed to defend Washington, D.C.. The mood when they left Boston was almost festive. When they arrived in the border state of Maryland three days later, everything changed. An angry mob awaited them. In the riot that followed, 16 people lost their lives. Four were soldiers from Massachusetts. These men were the first combat fatalities of the Civil War. no 0:01:00 Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Organized : January 21, 1861 UMass Researchers Clone Calves: January 20, 1998 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=23 On this day in 1998, two researchers affiliated with the University of Massachusetts drew worldwide attention when they went public with a birth announcement. The new arrivals, named Charlie and George, were genetically-identical Holstein calves. They were produced by new techniques that involved splicing human genes onto cow DNA and then cloning the animals. By cloning an already genetically-altered cow, the UMass team could then create a genetically-engineered herd. This made it possible to produce therapeutically altered milk in large enough quantities to be useful in creating drugs to treat human disease. Less famous than Dolly, the sheep cloned in Scotland, the UMass cows represented a great step forward in the effort to develop medicines using farm animals. Tue, 20 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=23 On this day in 1998, two researchers affiliated with the University of Massachusetts drew worldwide attention when they went public with a birth announcement. The new arrivals, named Charlie and George, were genetically-identical Holstein calves. They were produced by new techniques that involved splicing human genes onto cow DNA and then cloning the animals. By cloning an already genetically-altered cow, the UMass team could then create a genetically-engineered herd. This made it possible to produce therapeutically altered milk in large enough quantities to be useful in creating drugs to treat human disease. Less famous than Dolly, the sheep cloned in Scotland, the UMass cows represented a great step forward in the effort to develop medicines using farm animals. no 0:01:00 UMass Researchers Clone Calves: January 20, 1998 Isaiah Thomas Born: January 19, 1749 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=24 On this day in 1749, the Patriot printer Isaiah Thomas was born. In 1770, Thomas established the Massachusetts Spy, the first newspaper aimed at middle-class readers. While other papers were happy with 400 subscribers, the Spy had a circulation of 3,500. Thomas used the Spy to rally support for the cause of independence. Targeted by the British, he smuggled his press out of Boston to Worcester a few days before the Battle of Lexington and Concord. There, he continued publishing his newspaper. After the war, Thomas became the foremost publisher and printer in America. In 1812, he established the American Antiquarian Society, which today is one of the nation's most complete collections of printed work. Mon, 19 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=24 On this day in 1749, the Patriot printer Isaiah Thomas was born. In 1770, Thomas established the Massachusetts Spy, the first newspaper aimed at middle-class readers. While other papers were happy with 400 subscribers, the Spy had a circulation of 3,500. Thomas used the Spy to rally support for the cause of independence. Targeted by the British, he smuggled his press out of Boston to Worcester a few days before the Battle of Lexington and Concord. There, he continued publishing his newspaper. After the war, Thomas became the foremost publisher and printer in America. In 1812, he established the American Antiquarian Society, which today is one of the nation's most complete collections of printed work. no 0:01:00 Isaiah Thomas Born: January 19, 1749