Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sun, 19 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Natick Established: February 19, 1781 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=57 On this day in 1781, Natick was formally incorporated, but the town already had a long history. In 1651, a group of Christianized Indians had founded a "Praying Town" in what is now South Natick. Led by the missionary John Eliot, the Indians built an English-style village. For 25 years the town prospered. Then, with the outbreak of King Philip's War, the colonial authorities imprisoned all Christianized Indians on an island in Boston Harbor. After the war, the Natick Indians struggled to re-establish their community. They failed, but their history was not forgotten. In 2001, the people of Natick observed the 350th anniversary of the "Praying Indian" settlement that gave birth to their town. Sun, 19 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=57 On this day in 1781, Natick was formally incorporated, but the town already had a long history. In 1651, a group of Christianized Indians had founded a "Praying Town" in what is now South Natick. Led by the missionary John Eliot, the Indians built an English-style village. For 25 years the town prospered. Then, with the outbreak of King Philip's War, the colonial authorities imprisoned all Christianized Indians on an island in Boston Harbor. After the war, the Natick Indians struggled to re-establish their community. They failed, but their history was not forgotten. In 2001, the people of Natick observed the 350th anniversary of the "Praying Indian" settlement that gave birth to their town. no 0:01:00 Natick Established: February 19, 1781 Bostonians Respond to Irish Famine: February 18, 1847 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=56 On this day in 1847, Boston's leading citizens held a meeting at Fanueil Hall in response to news of the famine devastating Ireland. With the failure of the potato crop several years in a row, tens of thousands of Irish peasants were suffering from malnutrition, disease, and exposure. Between 1847 and 1851, 1,000,000 Irish men, women, and children died. As people in Boston realized the enormity of the disaster, donations poured in. The city's Catholic community sent $150,000 to the famine-stricken country. A relief committee collected 800 tons of food and clothing and persuaded the U.S. government to allow a fully-loaded warship to sail on a mercy mission from Boston to Ireland. Sat, 18 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=56 On this day in 1847, Boston's leading citizens held a meeting at Fanueil Hall in response to news of the famine devastating Ireland. With the failure of the potato crop several years in a row, tens of thousands of Irish peasants were suffering from malnutrition, disease, and exposure. Between 1847 and 1851, 1,000,000 Irish men, women, and children died. As people in Boston realized the enormity of the disaster, donations poured in. The city's Catholic community sent $150,000 to the famine-stricken country. A relief committee collected 800 tons of food and clothing and persuaded the U.S. government to allow a fully-loaded warship to sail on a mercy mission from Boston to Ireland. no 0:01:00 Bostonians Respond to Irish Famine: February 18, 1847 Mt. Holyoke Cable Car Burned: February 17, 1965 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=55 On this day in 1965, Massachusetts officials burned what was left of the wooden tramway that had carried thousands of people to the summit of Mt. Holyoke. Abandoned for decades, the deteriorating tramway was a safety hazard. But for 75 years, it was an unforgettable part of the experience of visiting Mt. Holyoke. As early as the 1830s, the mountain-top in Hadley was a popular destination for artists, writers, students, and ordinary sightseers. A series of ever-bigger hotels was built there. Then, in the 1920s and 30s, the car changed the way New Englanders spent their leisure time. By 1940, the hotel was closed; the land was donated to the Commonwealth for use as a state park. Fri, 17 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=55 On this day in 1965, Massachusetts officials burned what was left of the wooden tramway that had carried thousands of people to the summit of Mt. Holyoke. Abandoned for decades, the deteriorating tramway was a safety hazard. But for 75 years, it was an unforgettable part of the experience of visiting Mt. Holyoke. As early as the 1830s, the mountain-top in Hadley was a popular destination for artists, writers, students, and ordinary sightseers. A series of ever-bigger hotels was built there. Then, in the 1920s and 30s, the car changed the way New Englanders spent their leisure time. By 1940, the hotel was closed; the land was donated to the Commonwealth for use as a state park. no 0:01:00 Mt. Holyoke Cable Car Burned: February 17, 1965 First Esperanto Society Formed: February 16, 1905 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=54 On this day in 1905, the first Esperanto Society in the United States was established in Boston. Invented by a Polish doctor in the 1880s, Esperanto was an entirely new language created to promote international communication. With its simple grammar and phonetic spelling, Esperanto was easy to learn. It was soon adopted by large numbers of people in Central Europe, where many different languages were spoken in a relatively small geographic area. Boston in the early 1900s was full of intellectuals and scientists who found the idea of an international language appealing. Although it never gained widespread popularity in the U.S., today it is spoken by more than two million people around the world. Thu, 16 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=54 On this day in 1905, the first Esperanto Society in the United States was established in Boston. Invented by a Polish doctor in the 1880s, Esperanto was an entirely new language created to promote international communication. With its simple grammar and phonetic spelling, Esperanto was easy to learn. It was soon adopted by large numbers of people in Central Europe, where many different languages were spoken in a relatively small geographic area. Boston in the early 1900s was full of intellectuals and scientists who found the idea of an international language appealing. Although it never gained widespread popularity in the U.S., today it is spoken by more than two million people around the world. no 0:01:00 First Esperanto Society Formed: February 16, 1905 Shadrach Minkins Seized: February 15, 1851 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=53 On this day in 1851, a group of outraged black men burst into a courtroom in Boston and rescued Shadrach Minkins, the first escaped slave seized in New England under the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law. Under the new law, northern authorities were required to help owners recapture slaves who had escaped to the North. When Shadrach Minkins's master found out that he was in Boston, he had U.S. marshals arrest him. They took him to the federal courthouse in Boston, where an angry crowd gathered. They stormed the courtroom and freed Minkins. He was taken to a hiding place on Beacon Hill. That night, he began his journey on the Underground Railroad. Six days later, he arrived safely in Canada. Wed, 15 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=53 On this day in 1851, a group of outraged black men burst into a courtroom in Boston and rescued Shadrach Minkins, the first escaped slave seized in New England under the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law. Under the new law, northern authorities were required to help owners recapture slaves who had escaped to the North. When Shadrach Minkins's master found out that he was in Boston, he had U.S. marshals arrest him. They took him to the federal courthouse in Boston, where an angry crowd gathered. They stormed the courtroom and freed Minkins. He was taken to a hiding place on Beacon Hill. That night, he began his journey on the Underground Railroad. Six days later, he arrived safely in Canada. no 0:01:00 Shadrach Minkins Seized: February 15, 1851 First American-Made Valentines Sold: February 14, 1849 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=52 On this day in 1849, the first American-made valentines were sold in Worcester. They were designed and made by Esther Howland, the daughter of a local stationer. After graduating from Mt. Holyoke College, she returned to Worcester and began making valentines modeled on a fancy one she had received from an English friend. Her brother took the samples on a sales trip and came home with an astonishing $5,000 worth of orders. Howland began by hiring her friends to assemble the valentines; within a few years, she built her business into a $100,000 a year enterprise, a notable success for any entrepreneur but a truly remarkable accomplishment for a nineteenth-century woman. Tue, 14 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=52 On this day in 1849, the first American-made valentines were sold in Worcester. They were designed and made by Esther Howland, the daughter of a local stationer. After graduating from Mt. Holyoke College, she returned to Worcester and began making valentines modeled on a fancy one she had received from an English friend. Her brother took the samples on a sales trip and came home with an astonishing $5,000 worth of orders. Howland began by hiring her friends to assemble the valentines; within a few years, she built her business into a $100,000 a year enterprise, a notable success for any entrepreneur but a truly remarkable accomplishment for a nineteenth-century woman. no 0:01:00 First American-Made Valentines Sold: February 14, 1849 Boston Holds First "Rat Day": February 13, 1917 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=51 On this day in 1917, the Boston Women's Municipal League held the first -- and as it happened, only -- Rat Day. Increasing numbers of rats infested neighborhoods ranging from the overcrowded North End to the posh precincts of the Back Bay. The well-educated middle-class women who belonged to the League set out to remedy the problem. They launched an anti-rat education campaign, which culminated in "Rat Day." Prizes were offered to city residents who turned in the largest number of rat carcasses. Cold weather and a low level of interest among the public made for disappointing results. The event was not repeated. The problem was real, however, and the city of Boston picked up where the lady volunteers left off. Mon, 13 Feb 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=51 On this day in 1917, the Boston Women's Municipal League held the first -- and as it happened, only -- Rat Day. Increasing numbers of rats infested neighborhoods ranging from the overcrowded North End to the posh precincts of the Back Bay. The well-educated middle-class women who belonged to the League set out to remedy the problem. They launched an anti-rat education campaign, which culminated in "Rat Day." Prizes were offered to city residents who turned in the largest number of rat carcasses. Cold weather and a low level of interest among the public made for disappointing results. The event was not repeated. The problem was real, however, and the city of Boston picked up where the lady volunteers left off. no 0:01:00 Boston Holds First "Rat Day": February 13, 1917