Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Fri, 02 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Charles Dickens Begins Second American Tour: December 2, 1867 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=346 On this day in 1867, Charles Dickens began his second American reading tour at Boston's Tremont Temple. An enthusiastic audience, which included literary stars Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Ralph Waldo Emerson, seemed to have forgotten Dickens's widely known unflattering views of the United States described in his book American Notes. A 55-year-old Dickens read selections from A Christmas Carol and The Pickwick Papers. Although Dickens was in declining health, he embarked on an ambitious travel schedule. Six months later, having given more than 400 readings, Dickens returned to Boston once more before concluding his U.S. tour in New York City. He died two years later, having written 14 novels, several of which are classics of English literature. Fri, 02 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=346 On this day in 1867, Charles Dickens began his second American reading tour at Boston's Tremont Temple. An enthusiastic audience, which included literary stars Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Ralph Waldo Emerson, seemed to have forgotten Dickens's widely known unflattering views of the United States described in his book American Notes. A 55-year-old Dickens read selections from A Christmas Carol and The Pickwick Papers. Although Dickens was in declining health, he embarked on an ambitious travel schedule. Six months later, having given more than 400 readings, Dickens returned to Boston once more before concluding his U.S. tour in New York City. He died two years later, having written 14 novels, several of which are classics of English literature. no 0:01:00 Charles Dickens Begins Second American Tour: December 2, 1867 First Steamboat Passes Through South Hadley Canal: December 1, 1826 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=345 On this day in 1826, the Barnet, the first steamboat to operate on the Connecticut River, passed through the South Hadley Canal on its way to Vermont. For centuries, despite waterfalls along the way, New England's longest river had served as a major transportation route. In the late 1700s, increasing industrialization along the Connecticut motivated businessmen to build the country's first navigational canal at South Hadley to avoid the expense of portage. It opened in 1795, followed by the Turners Falls Canal three years later. The two canals increased river traffic to its peak. Stiff competition from the railroads in the 1840s brought the Connecticut's role as a highway to an end. The last boat passed through the South Hadley Canal in 1863. Thu, 01 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=345 On this day in 1826, the Barnet, the first steamboat to operate on the Connecticut River, passed through the South Hadley Canal on its way to Vermont. For centuries, despite waterfalls along the way, New England's longest river had served as a major transportation route. In the late 1700s, increasing industrialization along the Connecticut motivated businessmen to build the country's first navigational canal at South Hadley to avoid the expense of portage. It opened in 1795, followed by the Turners Falls Canal three years later. The two canals increased river traffic to its peak. Stiff competition from the railroads in the 1840s brought the Connecticut's role as a highway to an end. The last boat passed through the South Hadley Canal in 1863. no 0:01:00 First Steamboat Passes Through South Hadley Canal: December 1, 1826 George Peabody Thanks Danvers: November 30, 1853 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=344 On this day in 1853, George Peabody thanked the citizens of South Danvers for naming the high school in his honor and immediately set up a $200 account "to be expended as rewards of merit to the pupils." Fifteen years later, the town changed its name to Peabody as a tribute to its distinguished and generous native son. Born into a poor family, George Peabody received little formal education. He began an apprenticeship in a drygoods store at the age of 11. By the time he was in his forties, he had made a fortune in investment banking. He was an extraordinary philanthropist, donating almost $10,000,000 -- the equivalent of $130,000,000 today -- for education, libraries, museums, and homes for the working poor. Wed, 30 Nov 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=344 On this day in 1853, George Peabody thanked the citizens of South Danvers for naming the high school in his honor and immediately set up a $200 account "to be expended as rewards of merit to the pupils." Fifteen years later, the town changed its name to Peabody as a tribute to its distinguished and generous native son. Born into a poor family, George Peabody received little formal education. He began an apprenticeship in a drygoods store at the age of 11. By the time he was in his forties, he had made a fortune in investment banking. He was an extraordinary philanthropist, donating almost $10,000,000 -- the equivalent of $130,000,000 today -- for education, libraries, museums, and homes for the working poor. no 0:01:00 George Peabody Thanks Danvers: November 30, 1853 Longfellow's Wife Dies: November 29, 1835 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=343 On this day in 1835, 28-year-old Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was devastated by the death of his beloved young wife, Mary. The couple had been traveling in Europe as the poet prepared to begin teaching literature at Harvard. The distraught Longfellow gave vent to his grief, resolving to dedicate himself to a life of "goodness and purity like hers." He vowed to abandon "literary ambition . . . this destroyer of peace and quietude and the soul's self-possession," but by the time he returned to Cambridge in 1836, he had begun writing again. Over the next four decades, he would become the most popular American poet who ever lived. Contemporary poet Dana Gioia calls him the "one poet average, non-bookish Americans still know by heart." Tue, 29 Nov 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=343 On this day in 1835, 28-year-old Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was devastated by the death of his beloved young wife, Mary. The couple had been traveling in Europe as the poet prepared to begin teaching literature at Harvard. The distraught Longfellow gave vent to his grief, resolving to dedicate himself to a life of "goodness and purity like hers." He vowed to abandon "literary ambition . . . this destroyer of peace and quietude and the soul's self-possession," but by the time he returned to Cambridge in 1836, he had begun writing again. Over the next four decades, he would become the most popular American poet who ever lived. Contemporary poet Dana Gioia calls him the "one poet average, non-bookish Americans still know by heart." no 0:01:00 Longfellow's Wife Dies: November 29, 1835 Arlo Guthrie Convicted of Littering: November 28, 1965 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=342 On this day in 1965, 20-year-old Arlo Guthrie was convicted of littering in the Berkshire County town of Stockbridge, and the song "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" was born. The son of legendary musician Woody Guthrie, Arlo and a friend were spending Thanksgiving with Alice and Ray Brock at the couple's home in a former church. Alice asked the boys to take a load of trash to the town dump. When they arrived, they found that the dump was closed, so they threw the trash down a nearby hillside. Guthrie turned the story of their subsequent arrest and court appearance into a best-selling record. Thirty years later, he returned to the Berkshires. He purchased the former church building and converted it into an interfaith spiritual and social service center. Mon, 28 Nov 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=342 On this day in 1965, 20-year-old Arlo Guthrie was convicted of littering in the Berkshire County town of Stockbridge, and the song "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" was born. The son of legendary musician Woody Guthrie, Arlo and a friend were spending Thanksgiving with Alice and Ray Brock at the couple's home in a former church. Alice asked the boys to take a load of trash to the town dump. When they arrived, they found that the dump was closed, so they threw the trash down a nearby hillside. Guthrie turned the story of their subsequent arrest and court appearance into a best-selling record. Thirty years later, he returned to the Berkshires. He purchased the former church building and converted it into an interfaith spiritual and social service center. no 0:01:00 Arlo Guthrie Convicted of Littering: November 28, 1965 Workers Complete Hoosac Tunnel: November 27, 1874 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=341 On this day in 1874, workers in the small western Massachusetts town of Florida finished the Hoosac Tunnel, bringing to completion one of the world's most ambitious engineering projects. The Hoosac Mountain Range had long been a formidable natural barrier to the development of towns in the northern tier of Massachusetts. As industry grew in this part of the state, so did pressure for a rail connection across the mountains. Construction of the tunnel took more than 20 years, $17,000,000, and the lives of 196 men. On Thanksgiving Day in 1874, the last 16 feet of rock were blasted out of the way under North Adams. Two months later, the first train passed through what was then the second longest tunnel in the world. Sun, 27 Nov 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=341 On this day in 1874, workers in the small western Massachusetts town of Florida finished the Hoosac Tunnel, bringing to completion one of the world's most ambitious engineering projects. The Hoosac Mountain Range had long been a formidable natural barrier to the development of towns in the northern tier of Massachusetts. As industry grew in this part of the state, so did pressure for a rail connection across the mountains. Construction of the tunnel took more than 20 years, $17,000,000, and the lives of 196 men. On Thanksgiving Day in 1874, the last 16 feet of rock were blasted out of the way under North Adams. Two months later, the first train passed through what was then the second longest tunnel in the world. no 0:01:00 Workers Complete Hoosac Tunnel: November 27, 1874 First "National Day of Mourning" Held in Plymouth: November 26, 1970 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=340 On this day in 1970, a group of Native Americans attending a Thanksgiving feast in Plymouth walked out in protest. The Indians and their supporters gathered on a hill overlooking Plymouth Rock near a statue of Massasoit, the Wampanoag leader who had greeted the Mayflower passengers 350 years earlier. The protesters spoke about their long struggle to preserve their land and culture. The fourth Thursday in November was not a day for thanksgiving and feasting, they declared, but for grieving and fasting. As most Americans continued to observe the holiday in what had become the customary way -- with football, parades, and family gatherings -- the native people of Massachusetts began a new tradition: a "National Day of Mourning," held in lieu of Thanksgiving celebrations. Sat, 26 Nov 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=340 On this day in 1970, a group of Native Americans attending a Thanksgiving feast in Plymouth walked out in protest. The Indians and their supporters gathered on a hill overlooking Plymouth Rock near a statue of Massasoit, the Wampanoag leader who had greeted the Mayflower passengers 350 years earlier. The protesters spoke about their long struggle to preserve their land and culture. The fourth Thursday in November was not a day for thanksgiving and feasting, they declared, but for grieving and fasting. As most Americans continued to observe the holiday in what had become the customary way -- with football, parades, and family gatherings -- the native people of Massachusetts began a new tradition: a "National Day of Mourning," held in lieu of Thanksgiving celebrations. no 0:01:00 First "National Day of Mourning" Held in Plymouth: November 26, 1970