Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Fri, 29 May 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Vietnam Veterans Arrested on Lexington Green: May 30, 1971 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=159 On this day in 1971, over 450 anti-war protesters occupied the historic Lexington Green and refused to leave. The Vietnam Veterans Against the War had organized a three-day march from Concord to Boston -- Paul Revere's route in reverse. According to Lexington's by-laws, no one was allowed on the Green after 10 PM, so the selectmen denied the protesters permission to camp there. With many townspeople supporting the veterans, an emergency town meeting was held. When no agreement was reached, the veterans and their Lexington supporters decided to remain on the Green. At 3 AM on Sunday, they were all arrested in the largest mass arrest in Massachusetts history. After being tried, convicted, and fined $5.00 each, they continued their march to Boston. Sat, 30 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=159 On this day in 1971, over 450 anti-war protesters occupied the historic Lexington Green and refused to leave. The Vietnam Veterans Against the War had organized a three-day march from Concord to Boston -- Paul Revere's route in reverse. According to Lexington's by-laws, no one was allowed on the Green after 10 PM, so the selectmen denied the protesters permission to camp there. With many townspeople supporting the veterans, an emergency town meeting was held. When no agreement was reached, the veterans and their Lexington supporters decided to remain on the Green. At 3 AM on Sunday, they were all arrested in the largest mass arrest in Massachusetts history. After being tried, convicted, and fined $5.00 each, they continued their march to Boston. no 0:01:00 Vietnam Veterans Arrested on Lexington Green: May 30, 1971 Matzeliger Demonstrates Revolutionary Machine: May 29, 1885 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=158 On this day in 1885, Jan Matzeliger demonstrated his invention -- a machine that could finish 75 shoes in a 10-hour day. The most skilled craftsmen working by hand could turn out 50. An improved version of the machine was soon producing 700 shoes per day. An immigrant from Dutch Guiana, Matzeliger, who had settled in Lynn, had overcome the skepticism of co-workers who doubted that a black man with little schooling and poor English could come up with an invention that would revolutionize the shoemaking industry. In the mid-1880s, he and two partners started a business to manufacture his machine. Matzeliger died a few years later at the age of 37. The companies descended from the one he started are now worth more than a billion dollars. Fri, 29 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=158 On this day in 1885, Jan Matzeliger demonstrated his invention -- a machine that could finish 75 shoes in a 10-hour day. The most skilled craftsmen working by hand could turn out 50. An improved version of the machine was soon producing 700 shoes per day. An immigrant from Dutch Guiana, Matzeliger, who had settled in Lynn, had overcome the skepticism of co-workers who doubted that a black man with little schooling and poor English could come up with an invention that would revolutionize the shoemaking industry. In the mid-1880s, he and two partners started a business to manufacture his machine. Matzeliger died a few years later at the age of 37. The companies descended from the one he started are now worth more than a billion dollars. no 0:01:00 Matzeliger Demonstrates Revolutionary Machine: May 29, 1885 54th Massachusetts Regiment Marches Through Boston: May 28, 1863 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=157 On this day in 1863, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, the first black regiment from the North, paraded in full dress uniform on Boston Common. Crowds cheered as 1,007 black soldiers and 37 white officers passed in review. After ceremonies at the State House, they marched to Battery Wharf and boarded steamships for South Carolina. Just seven weeks later, 74 men and their commanding officer, Robert Gould Shaw, were killed in an heroic assault on Fort Wagner. On Memorial Day 1897, 60 veterans of the 54th were among hundreds of people who gathered on the Common for the unveiling of Augustus Saint-Gaundens' Memorial to Robert Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. This statue remains one of the great works of public art in the country. Thu, 28 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=157 On this day in 1863, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, the first black regiment from the North, paraded in full dress uniform on Boston Common. Crowds cheered as 1,007 black soldiers and 37 white officers passed in review. After ceremonies at the State House, they marched to Battery Wharf and boarded steamships for South Carolina. Just seven weeks later, 74 men and their commanding officer, Robert Gould Shaw, were killed in an heroic assault on Fort Wagner. On Memorial Day 1897, 60 veterans of the 54th were among hundreds of people who gathered on the Common for the unveiling of Augustus Saint-Gaundens' Memorial to Robert Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment. This statue remains one of the great works of public art in the country. no 0:01:00 54th Massachusetts Regiment Marches Through Boston: May 28, 1863 The "Big E" Incorporated: May 27, 1914 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=156 On this day in 1914, a group of western Massachusetts businessmen created a new organization, the Eastern States Agricultural and Industrial Exposition. Its purpose was to promote New England agriculture, which was in serious decline, by linking it to New England industry, which was thriving. In less than ten months, the men leading the Eastern States movement turned 175 acres of swampy land along the Westfield River into a showcase for agricultural and industrial exhibits and a place for wholesome entertainment. In the fall of 1916, 45,000 people attended the first event held on the grounds. Nearly 90 years later, the Big E, as the fair has long been called, draws 1,000,000 visitors a year to that same site in West Springfield. Wed, 27 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=156 On this day in 1914, a group of western Massachusetts businessmen created a new organization, the Eastern States Agricultural and Industrial Exposition. Its purpose was to promote New England agriculture, which was in serious decline, by linking it to New England industry, which was thriving. In less than ten months, the men leading the Eastern States movement turned 175 acres of swampy land along the Westfield River into a showcase for agricultural and industrial exhibits and a place for wholesome entertainment. In the fall of 1916, 45,000 people attended the first event held on the grounds. Nearly 90 years later, the Big E, as the fair has long been called, draws 1,000,000 visitors a year to that same site in West Springfield. no 0:01:00 The "Big E" Incorporated: May 27, 1914 Massachusetts Bay Colony Bans Catholic Priests: May 26, 1647 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=155 On this day in 1647, Massachusetts Bay banned Jesuit priests from the colony on penalty of death. The English Puritans who settled the colony feared the Jesuits for several reasons. First, simply because they were Catholic. To Puritans, Catholicism was nothing less than idolatrous blasphemy, and Catholics were destined for eternal damnation. Second, because the Jesuits were French, and France and England were engaged in a bitter struggle for control of North America. Finally, Jesuit missionaries had converted large numbers of Indians in Canada to Catholicism. Indian converts were potential allies of France and enemies of the English. Although no Jesuit was executed for defying the ban, the legacy of anti-Catholicism in Massachusetts survived for generations. Tue, 26 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=155 On this day in 1647, Massachusetts Bay banned Jesuit priests from the colony on penalty of death. The English Puritans who settled the colony feared the Jesuits for several reasons. First, simply because they were Catholic. To Puritans, Catholicism was nothing less than idolatrous blasphemy, and Catholics were destined for eternal damnation. Second, because the Jesuits were French, and France and England were engaged in a bitter struggle for control of North America. Finally, Jesuit missionaries had converted large numbers of Indians in Canada to Catholicism. Indian converts were potential allies of France and enemies of the English. Although no Jesuit was executed for defying the ban, the legacy of anti-Catholicism in Massachusetts survived for generations. no 0:01:00 Massachusetts Bay Colony Bans Catholic Priests: May 26, 1647 Fire Rages at Myles Standish State Forest: May 25, 1964 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=154 On this day in 1964, a raging wildfire crossed the boundaries of Myles Standish State Forest, and into the town of Plymouth. Two days earlier flames had consumed 800 acres of the forest, but firefighters believed they had the blaze under control. On the 25th, the wind shifted, and with terrifying speed, the re-ignited fire moved from west to east, destroying everything in its path. It stopped only when it reached White Island Pond. Fifty-five hundred acres and 26 structures had been destroyed. This was the last of many large fires to ravage Myles Standish State Forest in the twentieth century. Since the 1960s, rapid development surrounding the Forest has led foresters to develop a new tool for preventing fires; they intentionally set them. Mon, 25 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=154 On this day in 1964, a raging wildfire crossed the boundaries of Myles Standish State Forest, and into the town of Plymouth. Two days earlier flames had consumed 800 acres of the forest, but firefighters believed they had the blaze under control. On the 25th, the wind shifted, and with terrifying speed, the re-ignited fire moved from west to east, destroying everything in its path. It stopped only when it reached White Island Pond. Fifty-five hundred acres and 26 structures had been destroyed. This was the last of many large fires to ravage Myles Standish State Forest in the twentieth century. Since the 1960s, rapid development surrounding the Forest has led foresters to develop a new tool for preventing fires; they intentionally set them. no 0:01:00 Fire Rages at Myles Standish State Forest: May 25, 1964 Fugitive Slave Anthony Burns Arrested: May 24, 1854 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=153 On this day in 1854, Anthony Burns, a fugitive slave from Virginia, was arrested in Boston. His capture enraged black and white abolitionists. Two days after the arrest, a number of them attacked the federal courthouse with a battering ram, hoping to free Burns. Their attempt failed. Burns's defense lawyers were no more successful. After a brief trial, he was ordered returned to slavery. On June 2nd, thousands of people lined the streets of Boston. They hissed and shouted, "Shame! Shame!" as federal authorities escorted Anthony Burns to a ship waiting in the harbor. It took approximately 2,000 troops and cost $40,000 to maintain order and return the black man to bondage. No fugitive slave was ever captured in Massachusetts again. Sun, 24 May 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=153 On this day in 1854, Anthony Burns, a fugitive slave from Virginia, was arrested in Boston. His capture enraged black and white abolitionists. Two days after the arrest, a number of them attacked the federal courthouse with a battering ram, hoping to free Burns. Their attempt failed. Burns's defense lawyers were no more successful. After a brief trial, he was ordered returned to slavery. On June 2nd, thousands of people lined the streets of Boston. They hissed and shouted, "Shame! Shame!" as federal authorities escorted Anthony Burns to a ship waiting in the harbor. It took approximately 2,000 troops and cost $40,000 to maintain order and return the black man to bondage. No fugitive slave was ever captured in Massachusetts again. no 0:01:00 Fugitive Slave Anthony Burns Arrested: May 24, 1854