Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts Soldiers Threaten Mutiny: September 30, 1759 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=283 On this day in 1759, a regiment of Massachusetts men serving in the French and Indian War began to talk of mutiny against their British commander. The colonel had decided not to release the volunteers when their eight-month enlistment was over. Outraged, the men refused to perform their duties. The British Regulars were shocked at such insubordination and disloyalty, but the colonists were incensed that the army had not honored the terms of their contract. The French and Indian War was the first time most of these Massachusetts men had any contact with their Old World cousins, and the experience revealed that the Mother Country and her colonies had developed very different notions of authority and liberty. Fifteen years later, these differences would lead to a revolution. Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=283 On this day in 1759, a regiment of Massachusetts men serving in the French and Indian War began to talk of mutiny against their British commander. The colonel had decided not to release the volunteers when their eight-month enlistment was over. Outraged, the men refused to perform their duties. The British Regulars were shocked at such insubordination and disloyalty, but the colonists were incensed that the army had not honored the terms of their contract. The French and Indian War was the first time most of these Massachusetts men had any contact with their Old World cousins, and the experience revealed that the Mother Country and her colonies had developed very different notions of authority and liberty. Fifteen years later, these differences would lead to a revolution. no 0:01:00 Massachusetts Soldiers Threaten Mutiny: September 30, 1759 Architect H.H. Richardson Born: September 29, 1838 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=282 On this day in 1838, Henry Hobson Richardson, one of the true geniuses of American architecture, was born. A native of Louisiana, he received his architectural training in Paris. But the ties he formed during his years at Harvard College, including marriage to a Bostonian, led him to make Boston his home. He designed nearly 80 buildings, including churches, libraries, railroad stations, and private homes, many of them in Massachusetts. His buildings were visually striking and beautifully proportioned. He used forms inspired by early medieval churches, including rounded arches, massive towers, and rugged stone walls, with blocks often laid in bands of contrasting color. Widely copied across the nation, "Richardsonian Romanesque" became the first and only architectural style ever named after an American. Thu, 29 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=282 On this day in 1838, Henry Hobson Richardson, one of the true geniuses of American architecture, was born. A native of Louisiana, he received his architectural training in Paris. But the ties he formed during his years at Harvard College, including marriage to a Bostonian, led him to make Boston his home. He designed nearly 80 buildings, including churches, libraries, railroad stations, and private homes, many of them in Massachusetts. His buildings were visually striking and beautifully proportioned. He used forms inspired by early medieval churches, including rounded arches, massive towers, and rugged stone walls, with blocks often laid in bands of contrasting color. Widely copied across the nation, "Richardsonian Romanesque" became the first and only architectural style ever named after an American. no 0:01:00 Architect H.H. Richardson Born: September 29, 1838 Ted Williams Bats for the Last Time: September 28, 1960 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=281 On this day in 1960, Ted Williams thrilled the fans at Fenway by hitting a dramatic homer at his last at-bat in his 21-year career with the Boston Red Sox. A complicated man and brilliant player, he was beloved by fans even though he often snubbed them. He made up for his lack of physical strength with mental toughness. He single-mindedly pursued his goal of being "The Best Hitter Ever." He won two Triple Crowns, two MVP Awards, six batting titles, and -- in spite of spending nearly five full seasons in the military --amassed 521 home runs in his career. He retired with a lifetime batting average of .344 and "universal reverence" as perhaps the best hitter in the history of baseball. Wed, 28 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=281 On this day in 1960, Ted Williams thrilled the fans at Fenway by hitting a dramatic homer at his last at-bat in his 21-year career with the Boston Red Sox. A complicated man and brilliant player, he was beloved by fans even though he often snubbed them. He made up for his lack of physical strength with mental toughness. He single-mindedly pursued his goal of being "The Best Hitter Ever." He won two Triple Crowns, two MVP Awards, six batting titles, and -- in spite of spending nearly five full seasons in the military --amassed 521 home runs in his career. He retired with a lifetime batting average of .344 and "universal reverence" as perhaps the best hitter in the history of baseball. no 0:01:00 Ted Williams Bats for the Last Time: September 28, 1960 Office to Help Freed Slaves Opens in Worcester: September 27, 1867 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=280 On this day in 1867, a Worcester newspaper announced that "in accordance with the desire of a number of citizens," a freedmens' office would be established to make it easy for white employers to hire African Americans, newly arrived from the South. As a result of contact with soldiers and teachers from Worcester County, escaping and later emancipated slaves gravitated to central Massachusetts. The city's black population doubled in the 1860s, and the Civil War-era migration continued into the late nineteenth century. With help from the northerners who had befriended them, the local African American community, and the area's abolitionists, the refugees began to build families and institutions. The cultural traditions these southern migrants brought with them made Worcester's small black community a vibrant one. Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=280 On this day in 1867, a Worcester newspaper announced that "in accordance with the desire of a number of citizens," a freedmens' office would be established to make it easy for white employers to hire African Americans, newly arrived from the South. As a result of contact with soldiers and teachers from Worcester County, escaping and later emancipated slaves gravitated to central Massachusetts. The city's black population doubled in the 1860s, and the Civil War-era migration continued into the late nineteenth century. With help from the northerners who had befriended them, the local African American community, and the area's abolitionists, the refugees began to build families and institutions. The cultural traditions these southern migrants brought with them made Worcester's small black community a vibrant one. no 0:01:00 Office to Help Freed Slaves Opens in Worcester: September 27, 1867 Boston Garden Hosts Final Game: September 26, 1995 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=279 On this day in 1995, the Bruins played the final game at the Boston Garden. For almost 70 years, the cavernous building served as the city's main sports arena and exhibition hall. Here the Celtics won national championships, the Bruins captured the Stanley Cup, and crowds of 16,000 or more watched some of boxing's most exciting matches. Evangelical preachers led revivals, politicians launched campaigns, and rock-and-roll superstars entertained. One of the most popular traditions at the Garden was the annual appearance of the circus. Inevitably, the obstructed seats and lack of air conditioning doomed the aging Garden. In 1995 a new arena opened. Parts of the parquet floor -- the result of a post-war lumber shortage -- were preserved for sentiment's sake. Mon, 26 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=279 On this day in 1995, the Bruins played the final game at the Boston Garden. For almost 70 years, the cavernous building served as the city's main sports arena and exhibition hall. Here the Celtics won national championships, the Bruins captured the Stanley Cup, and crowds of 16,000 or more watched some of boxing's most exciting matches. Evangelical preachers led revivals, politicians launched campaigns, and rock-and-roll superstars entertained. One of the most popular traditions at the Garden was the annual appearance of the circus. Inevitably, the obstructed seats and lack of air conditioning doomed the aging Garden. In 1995 a new arena opened. Parts of the parquet floor -- the result of a post-war lumber shortage -- were preserved for sentiment's sake. no 0:01:00 Boston Garden Hosts Final Game: September 26, 1995 First Newspaper Published in the Colonies: September 25, 1690 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=278 On this day in 1690, Boston printer Benjamin Harris produced the first issue of Publick Occurrences, the first newspaper published in Britain's North American colonies. Readers were enthusiastic, but the governor was not. Under British law, "no person [was to] keep any printing-press for printing, nor [was] any book, pamphlet or other matter whatsoever" to be printed without the governor's "especial leave and license first obtained." In short, it was illegal to publish without the government's approval, and Harris had failed to obtain it. Within a few days, the governor and council had banned publication of the paper. Authorities collected and destroyed every copy they could find; the one copy known to have survived is preserved in the British Library. Sun, 25 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=278 On this day in 1690, Boston printer Benjamin Harris produced the first issue of Publick Occurrences, the first newspaper published in Britain's North American colonies. Readers were enthusiastic, but the governor was not. Under British law, "no person [was to] keep any printing-press for printing, nor [was] any book, pamphlet or other matter whatsoever" to be printed without the governor's "especial leave and license first obtained." In short, it was illegal to publish without the government's approval, and Harris had failed to obtain it. Within a few days, the governor and council had banned publication of the paper. Authorities collected and destroyed every copy they could find; the one copy known to have survived is preserved in the British Library. no 0:01:00 First Newspaper Published in the Colonies: September 25, 1690 First Merriam-Webster Dictionary Published in Springfield: September 24, 1847 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=277 On this day in 1847, Charles and George Merriam of Springfield published the first edition of The American Dictionary of the English Language. Four years earlier, the brothers had decided to take a major risk. The great lexicographer Noah Webster had just died, leaving behind a large stock of expensive, unsold dictionaries. They purchased the books and the right to publish any revisions. Priced at $6.00, the new, shorter edition was an immediate success. Massachusetts ordered a copy for every school in the state. Building on Noah Webster's original idea that the American nation needed a dictionary that reflected its distinctive use of the English language, Merriam-Webster's has been setting the standards for American English for the past 150 years. Sat, 24 Sep 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=277 On this day in 1847, Charles and George Merriam of Springfield published the first edition of The American Dictionary of the English Language. Four years earlier, the brothers had decided to take a major risk. The great lexicographer Noah Webster had just died, leaving behind a large stock of expensive, unsold dictionaries. They purchased the books and the right to publish any revisions. Priced at $6.00, the new, shorter edition was an immediate success. Massachusetts ordered a copy for every school in the state. Building on Noah Webster's original idea that the American nation needed a dictionary that reflected its distinctive use of the English language, Merriam-Webster's has been setting the standards for American English for the past 150 years. no 0:01:00 First Merriam-Webster Dictionary Published in Springfield: September 24, 1847