Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Wed, 20 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Dr. Susan Dimock Begins Medical Residency: August 20, 1872 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=243 On this day in 1872, Dr. Susan Dimock became the resident physician at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston. Only a month earlier, she had returned from medical school in Europe, where there was less hostility to women becoming doctors. In her three years at the New England Hospital, she handled day-to-day management, cared for patients, and performed surgery. Her most lasting contribution, however, was her work to improve the training of nurses. In Dimock's program, students not only worked on the wards, they also attended lectures and studied anatomy. Tragedy struck before Susan Dimock could see how much the professionalization of nursing did to transform American health care. She died in a shipwreck at the age of 28. Wed, 20 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=243 On this day in 1872, Dr. Susan Dimock became the resident physician at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston. Only a month earlier, she had returned from medical school in Europe, where there was less hostility to women becoming doctors. In her three years at the New England Hospital, she handled day-to-day management, cared for patients, and performed surgery. Her most lasting contribution, however, was her work to improve the training of nurses. In Dimock's program, students not only worked on the wards, they also attended lectures and studied anatomy. Tragedy struck before Susan Dimock could see how much the professionalization of nursing did to transform American health care. She died in a shipwreck at the age of 28. no 0:01:00 Dr. Susan Dimock Begins Medical Residency: August 20, 1872 Smithsonian Puts Julia Child's Kitchen on Display: August 19, 2002 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=241 On this day in 2002, a new exhibit opened in Washington, DC. The kitchen in Julia Child's Cambridge home of 32 years had been disassembled and moved to the Smithsonian. Designed by her husband Paul in 1961, the room was specially tailored to his wife's particular needs, with high countertops to accommodate her six-foot two-inch frame. In her ten cookbooks and eight television programs, several of which were filmed in her own kitchen, Julia Child demystified French cooking for American audiences. She became, in the words of the New York Times, "the French chef for a Jello nation." The exhibit is titled "Bon Appétit!" -- as she signed off at the end of every show she hosted during her 38 years as a television icon. Tue, 19 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=241 On this day in 2002, a new exhibit opened in Washington, DC. The kitchen in Julia Child's Cambridge home of 32 years had been disassembled and moved to the Smithsonian. Designed by her husband Paul in 1961, the room was specially tailored to his wife's particular needs, with high countertops to accommodate her six-foot two-inch frame. In her ten cookbooks and eight television programs, several of which were filmed in her own kitchen, Julia Child demystified French cooking for American audiences. She became, in the words of the New York Times, "the French chef for a Jello nation." The exhibit is titled "Bon Appétit!" -- as she signed off at the end of every show she hosted during her 38 years as a television icon. no 0:01:00 Smithsonian Puts Julia Child's Kitchen on Display: August 19, 2002 Fans Celebrate John L. Sullivan: August 18, 1887 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=240 On this day in 1887, thousands of adoring hometown fans flocked to Nantasket Beach in Hull to glimpse Boston-born John L. Sullivan, the Heavyweight Champion of the World, and the diamond-studded, gold-plated belt he was given on the eve of his world tour. Sullivan had escaped the poverty of his Irish immigrant family by fighting for money, despite the fact that it was illegal in most states. A remarkable record of 47 wins, one loss, and three draws brought Sullivan international fame and close to $1,000,000 in prize money. Alcoholism interrupted and finally ended his boxing career. Considered the first American sports idol, John L. Sullivan was known during his time as "the man most men wanted to be." Mon, 18 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=240 On this day in 1887, thousands of adoring hometown fans flocked to Nantasket Beach in Hull to glimpse Boston-born John L. Sullivan, the Heavyweight Champion of the World, and the diamond-studded, gold-plated belt he was given on the eve of his world tour. Sullivan had escaped the poverty of his Irish immigrant family by fighting for money, despite the fact that it was illegal in most states. A remarkable record of 47 wins, one loss, and three draws brought Sullivan international fame and close to $1,000,000 in prize money. Alcoholism interrupted and finally ended his boxing career. Considered the first American sports idol, John L. Sullivan was known during his time as "the man most men wanted to be." no 0:01:00 Fans Celebrate John L. Sullivan: August 18, 1887 Hawthorne Visits Natural Bridge in North Adams: August 17, 1883 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=239 On this day in 1838, Nathaniel Hawthorne visited Natural Bridge just outside of North Adams. It was just the kind of awe-inspiring scene that so moved early tourists. A 30-foot-long natural marble bridge -- the only one on the continent-- spanned a deep chasm that had been carved by melting glaciers thousands of years before. A Romantic, Hawthorne found the crags and fissures, torrents and pools, brilliant white marble and deep shadows uplifting. He noted with regret that nature's work was even then being re-worked by man. Quarrymen were extracting pure white marble. Fortunately, even after a century of quarrying, Natural Bridge is intact. It is as compelling a sight today as it was in 1838. Sun, 17 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=239 On this day in 1838, Nathaniel Hawthorne visited Natural Bridge just outside of North Adams. It was just the kind of awe-inspiring scene that so moved early tourists. A 30-foot-long natural marble bridge -- the only one on the continent-- spanned a deep chasm that had been carved by melting glaciers thousands of years before. A Romantic, Hawthorne found the crags and fissures, torrents and pools, brilliant white marble and deep shadows uplifting. He noted with regret that nature's work was even then being re-worked by man. Quarrymen were extracting pure white marble. Fortunately, even after a century of quarrying, Natural Bridge is intact. It is as compelling a sight today as it was in 1838. no 0:01:00 Hawthorne Visits Natural Bridge in North Adams: August 17, 1883 Oak Bluffs Writer Dorothy West Dies: August 16, 1998 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=238 On this day in 1998, Dorothy West died on Martha's Vineyard. The Boston-born writer was the last living member of the Harlem Renaissance, a movement of African-American artists, writers, and musicians that energized American culture in the 1920s. Although profoundly influenced by her years in New York, West was strongly tied to Massachusetts -- to the exclusive society of Boston's "Black Brahmins" in which she was raised and to the Martha's Vineyard town of Oak Bluffs where she spent idyllic childhood summers and where she lived for the last half of her life. From her cottage in Oak Bluffs, the former Methodist revival camp that became the nation's first black resort, West wrote stories and novels that illuminated the class- and color-consciousness she observed first hand in African-American society. Sat, 16 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=238 On this day in 1998, Dorothy West died on Martha's Vineyard. The Boston-born writer was the last living member of the Harlem Renaissance, a movement of African-American artists, writers, and musicians that energized American culture in the 1920s. Although profoundly influenced by her years in New York, West was strongly tied to Massachusetts -- to the exclusive society of Boston's "Black Brahmins" in which she was raised and to the Martha's Vineyard town of Oak Bluffs where she spent idyllic childhood summers and where she lived for the last half of her life. From her cottage in Oak Bluffs, the former Methodist revival camp that became the nation's first black resort, West wrote stories and novels that illuminated the class- and color-consciousness she observed first hand in African-American society. no 0:01:00 Oak Bluffs Writer Dorothy West Dies: August 16, 1998 Boston Police Vote to Unionize, Precipitating Riots: August 15, 1919 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=237 On this day in 1919, Boston policemen seeking better wages and working conditions voted to form a union. The Commissioner of Police forbid them to unionize. Tensions escalated until, three weeks later, 19 officers were suspended for their union activities. Three quarters of the oldest police department in the country went on strike. Within hours, street gangs had taken over the downtown. For two days, vandals, looters, and rapists ruled the streets. Order was restored only with the arrival of 4,700 bayonet-carrying soldiers. In Boston and around the country, the striking police were blamed for allowing the riots to occur. President Woodrow Wilson denounced the strike as "a crime against civilization." Fri, 15 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=237 On this day in 1919, Boston policemen seeking better wages and working conditions voted to form a union. The Commissioner of Police forbid them to unionize. Tensions escalated until, three weeks later, 19 officers were suspended for their union activities. Three quarters of the oldest police department in the country went on strike. Within hours, street gangs had taken over the downtown. For two days, vandals, looters, and rapists ruled the streets. Order was restored only with the arrival of 4,700 bayonet-carrying soldiers. In Boston and around the country, the striking police were blamed for allowing the riots to occur. President Woodrow Wilson denounced the strike as "a crime against civilization." no 0:01:00 Boston Police Vote to Unionize, Precipitating Riots: August 15, 1919 Boston Mob Protests Stamp Act: August 14, 1765 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=236 On this day in 1765, the British official charged with administering the hated Stamp Act was hung in effigy from an elm tree near Boston Common. A small group of merchants and master craftsmen had staged the prank, but soon a large crowd gathered to vent their anger at the Crown's interference with colonial affairs. Over the next weeks, the great elm emerged as the place in Boston for protest meetings. People of all classes -- including unskilled laborers, slaves, and women, who were normally excluded from official town meetings -- flocked to "Liberty Tree" to post notices, hear speeches, and hold outdoor meetings. The practice caught on, and with opposition to British rule mounting, Liberty Trees were soon found in many colonial towns. Thu, 14 Aug 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=236 On this day in 1765, the British official charged with administering the hated Stamp Act was hung in effigy from an elm tree near Boston Common. A small group of merchants and master craftsmen had staged the prank, but soon a large crowd gathered to vent their anger at the Crown's interference with colonial affairs. Over the next weeks, the great elm emerged as the place in Boston for protest meetings. People of all classes -- including unskilled laborers, slaves, and women, who were normally excluded from official town meetings -- flocked to "Liberty Tree" to post notices, hear speeches, and hold outdoor meetings. The practice caught on, and with opposition to British rule mounting, Liberty Trees were soon found in many colonial towns. no 0:01:00 Boston Mob Protests Stamp Act: August 14, 1765