Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sat, 19 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Battle Begins on Lexington Common: April 19, 1775 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=118 On this day in 1775, the first shots were fired in the cause of American independence. In Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous poem, "the shot heard 'round the world" came from the musket of a Concord militiaman. In reality, the first blood was shed hours before the Redcoats reached the Old North Bridge. The confrontation on Lexington Common between 77 militiamen and nearly ten times that number of British Regulars ended with the death of eight Lexington men. The Redcoats moved on to Concord. When they got there, they found several thousand farmer-soldiers who had already heard of the bloodshed at Lexington. With their nerves steeled, the Americans drove the Redcoats back to Boston and placed the city under siege. The Revolution had begun. Sat, 19 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=118 On this day in 1775, the first shots were fired in the cause of American independence. In Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous poem, "the shot heard 'round the world" came from the musket of a Concord militiaman. In reality, the first blood was shed hours before the Redcoats reached the Old North Bridge. The confrontation on Lexington Common between 77 militiamen and nearly ten times that number of British Regulars ended with the death of eight Lexington men. The Redcoats moved on to Concord. When they got there, they found several thousand farmer-soldiers who had already heard of the bloodshed at Lexington. With their nerves steeled, the Americans drove the Redcoats back to Boston and placed the city under siege. The Revolution had begun. no 0:01:00 Battle Begins on Lexington Common: April 19, 1775 G.E. Engineers Test Jet Engine: April 18, 1942 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=117 On this day in 1942, after months of highly secret work, GE engineers in Lynn successfully tested the engine they called by the innocuous name "I-A." It was the first jet engine built in the United States. An English scientist had designed a jet engine in 1941. When an Air Force general saw it power a plane, he was impressed enough to award General Electric a contract to adapt the design to American specifications. Installed with two of these I-A engines, a Bell P-59A aircraft made its maiden flight in the fall of 1942. Building on its success in Lynn, GE's Aircraft Engine division has since become the world's leading producer of jet engines used in commercial and military aircraft. Fri, 18 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=117 On this day in 1942, after months of highly secret work, GE engineers in Lynn successfully tested the engine they called by the innocuous name "I-A." It was the first jet engine built in the United States. An English scientist had designed a jet engine in 1941. When an Air Force general saw it power a plane, he was impressed enough to award General Electric a contract to adapt the design to American specifications. Installed with two of these I-A engines, a Bell P-59A aircraft made its maiden flight in the fall of 1942. Building on its success in Lynn, GE's Aircraft Engine division has since become the world's leading producer of jet engines used in commercial and military aircraft. no 0:01:00 G.E. Engineers Test Jet Engine: April 18, 1942 "Mill Girl" Writer Lucy Larcom Dies: April 17, 1893 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=116 On this day in 1893, Lucy Larcom died. A popular poet during her lifetime, she would be forgotten today except for a work of prose that she wrote in 1889. Her autobiography, A New England Girlhood, tells the story of her early childhood in the coastal village of Beverly and her move to Lowell, the mill town on the Merrimack River, where she lived and worked for more than a decade. She was a regular contributor to the Lowell Offering. The magazine was published by a group of "mill girls," as the young women who made up the great majority of workers in Massachusetts textile factories were called. Larcom's reputation as a poet soon faded, but A New England Girlhood remains an American classic. Thu, 17 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=116 On this day in 1893, Lucy Larcom died. A popular poet during her lifetime, she would be forgotten today except for a work of prose that she wrote in 1889. Her autobiography, A New England Girlhood, tells the story of her early childhood in the coastal village of Beverly and her move to Lowell, the mill town on the Merrimack River, where she lived and worked for more than a decade. She was a regular contributor to the Lowell Offering. The magazine was published by a group of "mill girls," as the young women who made up the great majority of workers in Massachusetts textile factories were called. Larcom's reputation as a poet soon faded, but A New England Girlhood remains an American classic. no 0:01:00 "Mill Girl" Writer Lucy Larcom Dies: April 17, 1893 Tip O'Neill Announces Run for Congress: April 16, 1952 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=115 On this day in 1952, Thomas P. ("Tip") O'Neill of Cambridge announced that he would run for the Congressional seat being vacated by John F. Kennedy as Kennedy began a campaign for the Senate. O'Neill had already served seven terms in the state legislature. He would serve in the U.S. Congress for the next 39 years, the last ten as Speaker of the House. An affable man who believed "all politics is local," O'Neill played an important role in national affairs --supporting civil rights, opposing the Vietnam War, and leading the fight for liberal causes. Although one of the most powerful men in the nation, at his death in 1994, O'Neill was remembered as a man who "never forgot where he came from." Wed, 16 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=115 On this day in 1952, Thomas P. ("Tip") O'Neill of Cambridge announced that he would run for the Congressional seat being vacated by John F. Kennedy as Kennedy began a campaign for the Senate. O'Neill had already served seven terms in the state legislature. He would serve in the U.S. Congress for the next 39 years, the last ten as Speaker of the House. An affable man who believed "all politics is local," O'Neill played an important role in national affairs --supporting civil rights, opposing the Vietnam War, and leading the fight for liberal causes. Although one of the most powerful men in the nation, at his death in 1994, O'Neill was remembered as a man who "never forgot where he came from." no 0:01:00 Tip O'Neill Announces Run for Congress: April 16, 1952 First Whale Watch Departs: April 15, 1975 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=114 On this day in 1975 charter boat captain Al Avellar left Provincetown Harbor with a boatload of school children. They were going to look, not fish. This was the first whale-watching trip on the eastern seaboard. Al Avellar soon established the first whale-watching company on the Atlantic coast and began to expand his fleet, adding vessels especially designed for viewing whales. The whale-watching business flourished and spread to Boston and Cape Ann. Today over 2,000,000 people a year view the friendly and playful cetaceans that frequent the waters of New England between April and October. Eighty-five years after the region's whaling industry disappeared, whale watching is a $100,000,000 business in New England. Tue, 15 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=114 On this day in 1975 charter boat captain Al Avellar left Provincetown Harbor with a boatload of school children. They were going to look, not fish. This was the first whale-watching trip on the eastern seaboard. Al Avellar soon established the first whale-watching company on the Atlantic coast and began to expand his fleet, adding vessels especially designed for viewing whales. The whale-watching business flourished and spread to Boston and Cape Ann. Today over 2,000,000 people a year view the friendly and playful cetaceans that frequent the waters of New England between April and October. Eighty-five years after the region's whaling industry disappeared, whale watching is a $100,000,000 business in New England. no 0:01:00 First Whale Watch Departs: April 15, 1975 Massachusetts Passes First Education Law: April 14, 1642 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=113 On this day in 1642, Massachusetts Bay Colony passed the first law in the New World requiring that children be taught to read and write. The English Puritans who founded Massachusetts believed that the well-being of individuals, along with the success of the colony, depended on a people literate enough to read both the Bible and the laws of the land. Concerned that parents were ignoring the first law, in 1647 Massachusetts passed another one requiring that all towns establish and maintain public schools. It would be many years before these schools were open to all children. Only in the mid-nineteenth century was universal free public schooling guaranteed – in time, made compulsory -- for Massachusetts children. Mon, 14 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=113 On this day in 1642, Massachusetts Bay Colony passed the first law in the New World requiring that children be taught to read and write. The English Puritans who founded Massachusetts believed that the well-being of individuals, along with the success of the colony, depended on a people literate enough to read both the Bible and the laws of the land. Concerned that parents were ignoring the first law, in 1647 Massachusetts passed another one requiring that all towns establish and maintain public schools. It would be many years before these schools were open to all children. Only in the mid-nineteenth century was universal free public schooling guaranteed – in time, made compulsory -- for Massachusetts children. no 0:01:00 Massachusetts Passes First Education Law: April 14, 1642 First CCC Enrollees Arrive at Ft. Devens : April 13, 1933 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=112 On this day in 1933, the first enrollees of the Massachusetts Civilian Conservation Corps arrived at Fort Devens in Ayer. They were soldiers in a peacetime army that, in the words of the men who served in it, "brought together two wasted resources, the young men and the land, in an effort to save both." The effort was a huge success, and the CCC was one of the most popular programs of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. Over a period of nine years, nearly 100,000 Massachusetts men lived and worked in CCC camps spread across the state. The roads and trails, bridges and overlooks, picnic shelters and log cabins they built in the state's parks are the Triple C's living legacy in Massachusetts. Sun, 13 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=112 On this day in 1933, the first enrollees of the Massachusetts Civilian Conservation Corps arrived at Fort Devens in Ayer. They were soldiers in a peacetime army that, in the words of the men who served in it, "brought together two wasted resources, the young men and the land, in an effort to save both." The effort was a huge success, and the CCC was one of the most popular programs of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. Over a period of nine years, nearly 100,000 Massachusetts men lived and worked in CCC camps spread across the state. The roads and trails, bridges and overlooks, picnic shelters and log cabins they built in the state's parks are the Triple C's living legacy in Massachusetts. no 0:01:00 First CCC Enrollees Arrive at Ft. Devens : April 13, 1933