Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Mon, 02 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Perkins School for the Blind Incorporated: March 2, 1829 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=68 On this day in 1829, the New England Asylum for the Blind was incorporated in Boston. Begun with six students, within six years, the institution had ten times that number. For the first time, blind and deafblind American children could attend a school that would teach them reading, writing, and mathematics. Students were taught to use their sense of touch to compensate for their lack of sight. Re-named the Perkins Institute for the Blind, in honor of an early benefactor, the school grew steadily through the nineteenth century until it became the world-renowned institution it is today. The school's most famous graduate is Helen Keller, who arrived there with her teacher Annie Sullivan in 1888. Mon, 02 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=68 On this day in 1829, the New England Asylum for the Blind was incorporated in Boston. Begun with six students, within six years, the institution had ten times that number. For the first time, blind and deafblind American children could attend a school that would teach them reading, writing, and mathematics. Students were taught to use their sense of touch to compensate for their lack of sight. Re-named the Perkins Institute for the Blind, in honor of an early benefactor, the school grew steadily through the nineteenth century until it became the world-renowned institution it is today. The school's most famous graduate is Helen Keller, who arrived there with her teacher Annie Sullivan in 1888. no 0:01:00 Perkins School for the Blind Incorporated: March 2, 1829 Worcester Becomes a City : March 1, 1848 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=377 On this day in 1848, the Governor of Massachusetts signed a charter giving the once-sleepy village of Worcester the legal status of a city. For over a century, Worcester's isolated location in the hilly center of Massachusetts caused it to grow more slowly than coastal ports like Boston and river towns like Springfield. The opening of a canal link to Providence in 1828 and the arrival of the railroads only a few years later spurred the growth of industry and commerce. Local investors and a highly skilled work force helped create an unusually diversified economy. Worcester was well on its way to becoming the second-largest city in the state, indeed in all of New England. So it has remained to the present day. Sun, 01 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=377 On this day in 1848, the Governor of Massachusetts signed a charter giving the once-sleepy village of Worcester the legal status of a city. For over a century, Worcester's isolated location in the hilly center of Massachusetts caused it to grow more slowly than coastal ports like Boston and river towns like Springfield. The opening of a canal link to Providence in 1828 and the arrival of the railroads only a few years later spurred the growth of industry and commerce. Local investors and a highly skilled work force helped create an unusually diversified economy. Worcester was well on its way to becoming the second-largest city in the state, indeed in all of New England. So it has remained to the present day. no 0:01:00 Worcester Becomes a City : March 1, 1848 Bedford Responds to "Boston Pamphlet": March 1, 1773 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=67 On this day in 1773, the town of Bedford held its annual meeting. Along with the routine matters to be addressed, there was one unusual item of business. The Town Meeting was asked to decide if it agreed with Boston's "sentiments related to the state of the Colonists as to their Rights and Liberties." A pamphlet detailing these sentiments--a mixture of outrage, exaggeration, and alarm--had been sent to selectmen in every Massachusetts town. Britain was tightening its control on its American colonies, and the colonists believed that their rights as English citizens were threatened. The response to the Boston Pamphlet made it clear that, in Bedford and many other Massachusetts towns, people were prepared to resist British authority. Sun, 01 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=67 On this day in 1773, the town of Bedford held its annual meeting. Along with the routine matters to be addressed, there was one unusual item of business. The Town Meeting was asked to decide if it agreed with Boston's "sentiments related to the state of the Colonists as to their Rights and Liberties." A pamphlet detailing these sentiments--a mixture of outrage, exaggeration, and alarm--had been sent to selectmen in every Massachusetts town. Britain was tightening its control on its American colonies, and the colonists believed that their rights as English citizens were threatened. The response to the Boston Pamphlet made it clear that, in Bedford and many other Massachusetts towns, people were prepared to resist British authority. no 0:01:00 Bedford Responds to "Boston Pamphlet": March 1, 1773 Northampton Bank Receives Ransom Note: February 28, 1876 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=66 On this day in 1876, a ransom note was sent to the Northampton National Bank. Just a month earlier, a notorious gang of New York thieves had managed to break through the bank's new security system. Within a matter of hours, they made off with the largest heist of cash and bonds in U.S. history. The $1,600,000 stolen would be worth over $26,000,000 today. The crime was carefully planned and brilliantly executed, but the thieves were less successful in getting the bank to ransom the bonds. They negotiated for nearly a year before Pinkerton detectives finally tracked them down. The ringleaders were arrested, tried, and convicted. The cash was never recovered. Sat, 28 Feb 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=66 On this day in 1876, a ransom note was sent to the Northampton National Bank. Just a month earlier, a notorious gang of New York thieves had managed to break through the bank's new security system. Within a matter of hours, they made off with the largest heist of cash and bonds in U.S. history. The $1,600,000 stolen would be worth over $26,000,000 today. The crime was carefully planned and brilliantly executed, but the thieves were less successful in getting the bank to ransom the bonds. They negotiated for nearly a year before Pinkerton detectives finally tracked them down. The ringleaders were arrested, tried, and convicted. The cash was never recovered. no 0:01:00 Northampton Bank Receives Ransom Note: February 28, 1876 Malcolm X Imprisoned: February 27, 1946 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=65 On this day in 1946, 20-year-old Malcolm Little entered the state prison in Charlestown to begin serving a sentence for burglary. While in jail, he joined the Black Muslims, a new branch of Islam. Burning to know more about his faith, he began a campaign to improve his reading and writing. After copying an entire dictionary page-by-page, he read every book the prison library had in philosophy, history, literature, and science. He later said, "Months passed without my even thinking about being imprisoned. In fact, up to then, I had never been so truly free in my life." When he was paroled in 1952, Malcolm X became one of the country's most compelling black leaders. Fri, 27 Feb 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=65 On this day in 1946, 20-year-old Malcolm Little entered the state prison in Charlestown to begin serving a sentence for burglary. While in jail, he joined the Black Muslims, a new branch of Islam. Burning to know more about his faith, he began a campaign to improve his reading and writing. After copying an entire dictionary page-by-page, he read every book the prison library had in philosophy, history, literature, and science. He later said, "Months passed without my even thinking about being imprisoned. In fact, up to then, I had never been so truly free in my life." When he was paroled in 1952, Malcolm X became one of the country's most compelling black leaders. no 0:01:00 Malcolm X Imprisoned: February 27, 1946 First Slaves Arrive in Massachusetts: February 26, 1638 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=64 On this day in 1638, a ship returned to Massachusetts Bay from the West Indies after a seven-month voyage. Its cargo included cotton, tobacco and, as far as we know, the first African slaves to be imported into Massachusetts. When the Pequot Indians lost a war with the English in 1638, the fate of the vanquished was to be enslaved by the victors. The defiant Pequots made poor slaves, however, and many of them were shipped to Bermuda in exchange for African bondsmen. In 1641 the Massachusett Bay Colony adopted a code of laws that made slavery legal. It would remain so for the next 140 years. Thu, 26 Feb 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=64 On this day in 1638, a ship returned to Massachusetts Bay from the West Indies after a seven-month voyage. Its cargo included cotton, tobacco and, as far as we know, the first African slaves to be imported into Massachusetts. When the Pequot Indians lost a war with the English in 1638, the fate of the vanquished was to be enslaved by the victors. The defiant Pequots made poor slaves, however, and many of them were shipped to Bermuda in exchange for African bondsmen. In 1641 the Massachusett Bay Colony adopted a code of laws that made slavery legal. It would remain so for the next 140 years. no 0:01:00 First Slaves Arrive in Massachusetts: February 26, 1638 William Dawes Dies: February 25, 1799 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=63 On this day in 1799, William Dawes died. The first man to be dispatched on the night of April 18, 1775, Dawes carried the same message as Paul Revere, but while Revere rowed across the harbor and mounted a horse in Charlestown, Dawes went overland, galloping through Roxbury and Watertown. Both men managed to deliver the warning to Samuel Adams and John Hancock in Lexington. They set off together for Concord, but were stopped by a British army patrol. Revere was arrested. Dawes staged a ruse and escaped. The poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow later immortalized Paul Revere and his midnight ride. William Dawes, the other hero of that night, died unheralded. Wed, 25 Feb 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=63 On this day in 1799, William Dawes died. The first man to be dispatched on the night of April 18, 1775, Dawes carried the same message as Paul Revere, but while Revere rowed across the harbor and mounted a horse in Charlestown, Dawes went overland, galloping through Roxbury and Watertown. Both men managed to deliver the warning to Samuel Adams and John Hancock in Lexington. They set off together for Concord, but were stopped by a British army patrol. Revere was arrested. Dawes staged a ruse and escaped. The poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow later immortalized Paul Revere and his midnight ride. William Dawes, the other hero of that night, died unheralded. no 0:01:00 William Dawes Dies: February 25, 1799