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Author Why wasn't it produced in WW II?

Zinc
Joined: Oct 2007
Apr 18, 2008 03:30

If we successfully tested a jet aircraft in the fall of 1942 why didn't we produce one for use in WW II? The war, with respect to the Pacific area, would last almost 3 more years.


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elibort
Joined: Aug 2005
Apr 18, 2008 15:26

Who was it that described Boston as the place where the Charles and Mystic Rivers come together to form the Atlantic Ocean?

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Eli Bortman
Babson College


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elibort
Joined: Aug 2005
Apr 18, 2008 15:27

I would have asked the question in a slightly differnt manner -- did the U.S. have any jet planes before the end of WWII? Didn't the Germans have some jets right before the end?

-------------------------
Eli Bortman
Babson College


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Zinc
Joined: Oct 2007
Apr 18, 2008 19:11   modified on Apr 18, 2008 19:38

The answer to your question is the U. S. didn't produce any jet aircraft that saw actual combat in WW II; hence, the real question is why?
As for the Germans, the Messerschmitt ME 262 jet fighter made its initial test flight on July 18, 1942. It first saw action in Aug., 1944. By war's end more than 1,400 ME 262's, of all variants, had been produced. Of these approximately 200 were involved in combat. There were many reasons why roughly one-seventh of the production run saw combat, some examples would be: shortage of trained pilots and fuel, engines changes were necessary after 20 to 25 hours of operation, continued allied bombing of production facilities and selected airfields, and there were only a few airfields capable of effectively handling the ME 262 --- Concret runways were needed because the jet engines tended to melt tar runways. How many of the approx. 200 were destroyed in air to air combat is not exactly known.


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